Photo of Lin Chang, MD
Lin Chang, MD
Director, Functional GI Disroders Program, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Lin Chang, MD, is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Neurobiology of Stress at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She is also Director of the Digestive Health and Nutrition Clinic at UCLA. Dr. Chang’s clinical expertise is in functional gastrointestinal disorders which include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic constipation, and functional dyspepsia. Dr. Chang’s research is focused on the pathophysiology of IBS related to stress, sex differences, and neuroendocrine alterations and the treatment of IBS. She is a funded NIH-investigator studying the central and peripheral mechanisms underlying IBS.

She is the recipient of the Janssen Award in Gastroenterology for Basic or Clinical Research and the AGA Distinguished Clinician Award, Dr. Chang has authored more than 70 original research articles, 48 review articles, and 19 book chapters on her specialty interests and is a frequent speaker at national and international meetings. She is a fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association and American College of Gastroenterology, and a member of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Chang serves as an Associate Editor of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. She is a member of the Rome Foundation Board of Directors, the Rome IV Editorial Board and the Rome IV Functional Bowel Disorders Committee. She is President of the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ANMS). She served on the FDA GI Advisory Committee from 2005-2010 which she also chaired.

Selected References

Chang L, Adeyemo M, Karagiannides I, Videlock EJ, Bowe C, Shih W, Presson AA, Yuan PQ, Gong H, Singh S, Cortina G, Licudine A, Tache Y, Pothoulakis C, Mayer EA. Serum and colonic immune markers in irritable bowel syndrome. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012; 107(2):262-72.

Naliboff BD, Kim S, Bolus R, Bernstein CN, Mayer EA, Chang L. Gastrointestinal and Psychological Mediators of Health Related Quality of Life in IBS and IBD: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012;107:451–459..

Bradford K, Shih W, Videlock E, Presson AP, Naliboff BD, Mayer EA, Chang L. Association of early adverse life events and irritable bowel syndrome. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2012;10(4):385-390.

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Emeran A. Mayer, MD, PhD
Director, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Emeran Mayer is a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Executive Director of the Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, and Co-director of the CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center at UCLA. He is a world renowned gastroenterologist and neuroscientist with 30 years of experience in the study of clinical and neurobiological aspects of how the digestive system and the nervous system interact in health and disease, and his work has been continuously supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He is currently principal investigator on 4 NIH grants including a center grant from ORWH/NIDDK on sex differences in brain gut interactions, a consortium grant by NIDDK on pelvic pain syndromes, a RO1 grant on the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on brain signatures in IBS and a ROI grant on brain gut microbiome interactions in inflammatory and functional GI disorders (both from NIDDK). He has published over 320 peer reviewed articles (average H index 90), including 100 chapters and reviews, co-edited four books, and organized several interdisciplinary symposia in the area of visceral pain and mind body interactions. His current research focus is on the role of the gut microbiota in brain gut interactions in emotion regulation, chronic visceral pain and in obesity.

Selected References:

Complete reference list: https://scholar.google.com/mayerea

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Suzanne Smith, NP
Nurse CoordinatorG. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Phone: (310) 206-0310Fax: (310) 825-1919

Suzanne R Smith is a Nurse Practitioner in the Department of Medicine, Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She has been involved in mind-brain-body research at the G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience at UCLA since 2005. She worked with critically ill children and their families for many years prior to joining the center. Her research interests include chronic pain, brain-gut interactions and mindfulness meditation as a modality for various pain disorders. She is also an Integrative Health Practitioner in the Digestive Health and Nutrition Clinic at UCLA. Her clinical expertise is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, offering tools to empower and restore a sense of ease and wellbeing.

She has a BA in East/West cross cultural studies, a BS in Nursing and in 2004 completed her graduate work in the Family Nurse Practitioner program at UCLA. She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing and the California Association of Nurse Practitioners.

She completed the UCLA Urban Zen Integrative Therapist Program in 2012.

She trained with the Heart Touch Project and volunteers offering compassionate touch to the dying.

She is a graduate of Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC), Fearless Compassionate Care, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness Facilitation Teacher Training Programs. She teaches mindfulness at UCLA for brain imaging research and for patient populations. She teaches at Insight LA Meditation Center where she runs the Fearless Compassionate Care Program for Caregivers. She teaches Mindful Self Compassion at the Cancer Support Community and has also taught at corporations and in the community.

Selected References

Kilpatrick LA, Suyenobu BY, Smith SR, Bueller JA, Goodman T, Creswell JD, Tillisch K, Mayer EA, Naliboff BD. Impact of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction training on intrinsic brain connectivity. Neuroimage. 2011 May 1;56(1):290-8.

Hong JY1, Kilpatrick LA, Labus J, Gupta A, Jiang Z, Ashe-McNalley C, Stains J, Heendeniya N, Ebrat B, Smith S, Tillisch K, Naliboff B, Mayer EA. Patients with chronic visceral pain show sex-related alterations in intrinsic oscillations of the resting brain. J Neurosci. 2013 Jul 17;33(29):11994-2002. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5733-12.2013.

Hong JY, Kilpatrick LA, Labus JS, Gupta A, Katibian D, Ashe-McNalley C, Stains J, Heendeniya N, Smith SR, Tillisch K, Naliboff B, Mayer EA. Sex and diseaserelated alterations of anterior insula functional connectivity in chronic abdominal pain. J Neurosci. 2014 Oct 22;34(43):14252-9. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1683-14.2014.

Hubbard CS, Hong J, Jiang Z, Ebrat B, Suyenobu B, Smith S, Heendeniya, N, Naliboff BD, Tillisch K, Mayer EA, Labus JS. Increased attential network functioning related to symptom severity measures in females with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Neurogastroenterology Motility 2015 Sep;27(9) 1282-94 doi 10.1111/nmo 12622 E pub2015 Jun 19

Hong, JY, Naliboff B, Labus JS, Gupta A, Kilpatrick LA, Ashe-Mc Nalley C, Stains J, Heendeniya N, Smith SR, Tillisch K, Mayer EA. Altered brain responses in subjects with irritable Bowel Syndrome during cued and uncued pain expectation. Neurogastroenterology Motility 2016 Jan;28 (1):127-38

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Kirsten Tillisch, MD
Director, Mind Body Research Program, Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 267-0537Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279

Dr. Kirsten Tillisch completed her undergraduate work at the Otis Institute of Parsons School of Design, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honors. She obtained her medical degree from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and was elected to the medical honor society Alpha Omega Alpha. She continued on at UCLA to complete her training in internal medicine and gastroenterology, graduating in 2003. Her clinical interests are functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and cyclic vomiting syndrome. Her research interests include brain-gut interactions , the effects of nonpharmacological therapies on functional gastrointestinal disorders, and pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Her recent research projects include defining resting state brain dysfunction in irritable bowel syndrome patients, evaluating the role of gut microbiota modulation on emotional processing in the brain, and assessment of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists effects on the gut and brain in irritable bowel syndrome. She is a member of the Neuroimaging Program of the Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress.

Selected References:

Mayer EA, Tillisch K, Gupta A. Gut/brain axis and the microbiota. J Clin Invest. 2015 Mar 2;125(3):926-38. doi: 10.1172/JCI76304. Epub 2015 Feb 17. Review. PubMed PMID: 25689247; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4362231.

Mayer EA, Knight R, Mazmanian SK, Cryan JF, Tillisch K. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience. J Neurosci. 2014 Nov 12;34(46):15490-6. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3299-14.2014. Review. PubMed PMID: 25392516; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4228144.

Mayer EA, Padua D, Tillisch K. Altered brain-gut axis in autism: comorbidity or causative mechanisms? Bioessays. 2014 Oct;36(10):933-9. doi: 10.1002/bies.201400075. Epub 2014 Aug 22. Review. PubMed PMID: 25145752.

Tillisch K, Labus JS. Neuroimaging the microbiome-gut-brain axis. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2014;817:405-16. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0897-4_18. Review. PubMed PMID: 24997044.

Tillisch K. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans. Gut Microbes. 2014 May-Jun;5(3):404-10. doi: 10.4161/gmic.29232. Epub 2014 May 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 24838095; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4153780.

Tillisch K, Labus J, Kilpatrick L, Jiang Z, Stains J, Ebrat B, Guyonnet D, Legrain-Raspaud S, Trotin B, Naliboff B, Mayer EA. Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity. Gastroenterology. 2013 Jun;144(7):1394-401, 1401.e1-4. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043. Epub 2013 Mar 6. PubMed PMID: 23474283; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3839572.

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