Photo of Lin Chang, MD
Lin Chang, MD
Director, Functional GI Disroders Program, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
View Bio
Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Lin Chang, MD, is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Neurobiology of Stress at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She is also Director of the Digestive Health and Nutrition Clinic at UCLA. Dr. Chang’s clinical expertise is in functional gastrointestinal disorders which include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic constipation, and functional dyspepsia. Dr. Chang’s research is focused on the pathophysiology of IBS related to stress, sex differences, and neuroendocrine alterations and the treatment of IBS. She is a funded NIH-investigator studying the central and peripheral mechanisms underlying IBS.

She is the recipient of the Janssen Award in Gastroenterology for Basic or Clinical Research and the AGA Distinguished Clinician Award, Dr. Chang has authored more than 70 original research articles, 48 review articles, and 19 book chapters on her specialty interests and is a frequent speaker at national and international meetings. She is a fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association and American College of Gastroenterology, and a member of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Chang serves as an Associate Editor of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. She is a member of the Rome Foundation Board of Directors, the Rome IV Editorial Board and the Rome IV Functional Bowel Disorders Committee. She is President of the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ANMS). She served on the FDA GI Advisory Committee from 2005-2010 which she also chaired.

Selected References

Chang L, Adeyemo M, Karagiannides I, Videlock EJ, Bowe C, Shih W, Presson AA, Yuan PQ, Gong H, Singh S, Cortina G, Licudine A, Tache Y, Pothoulakis C, Mayer EA. Serum and colonic immune markers in irritable bowel syndrome. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012; 107(2):262-72.

Naliboff BD, Kim S, Bolus R, Bernstein CN, Mayer EA, Chang L. Gastrointestinal and Psychological Mediators of Health Related Quality of Life in IBS and IBD: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012;107:451–459..

Bradford K, Shih W, Videlock E, Presson AP, Naliboff BD, Mayer EA, Chang L. Association of early adverse life events and irritable bowel syndrome. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2012;10(4):385-390.

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Arpana Gupta, PhD
Arpana Gupta, PhD
Assistant Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress
View Bio
Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Arpana (Annie) Gupta completed a PhD degree in Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, followed by an APA accredited clinical internship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical Center. After coming to UCLA she joined the neuroimaging and psychophysiological cores at the Center for Neurobiology of Stress in 2012. She is currently Adjunct Assistant Professor, where she specializes in research that investigates the influence of environmental factors on shaping neurobiological phenotypes associated with stress and pain-based diseases such as obesity and functional gastroenterological disorders (FGIDs) [vuvlodynia, irritable bowel syndrome]. Her programmatic line of research broadly defined focuses on the bidirectional interactions between the brain and peripheral factors (in particular immune factors and gut microbiota-related metabolites) and how these interactions are modified by vulnerability (early adversity, race, adult stress, socioeconomic status [SES], diet) and protective (resilience, exercise) factors in contributing to the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders. She is dedicated to using advanced automated and mathematical analytic techniques, which allows her to integrate information from multiple data sources, while accounting for sex and race differences. Her goal is to develop a comprehensive model that provides a powerful and sensitive biomarker that will increase biological readouts of these stress and pain-based disorders, thus bringing to the forefront those individuals who are at increased risk as a result of disadvantaged backgrounds.

Selected References

Gupta A, Mayer EA, Sanmiguel CP, Van Horn JD, Woodworth D, Ellingson BM, Fling C, Love A, Tillisch K, Labus JS. Patterns of Brain Structural Connectivity Differentiate Lean from Overweight Subjects. Neuroimage-Clinical, 2015. 13(7): 506-17. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2015.01.005 [Epub Ahead of Print]. PMCID: PMC4338207.

Mayer EA, Tillisch K, Gupta A. Gut-Brain Axis and the Microbiota. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2015; 125(3): 926-38. doi: 10.1172/JCI76304. [Epub ahead of Print]. PMID: 25689247.

Sanmiguel CP, Gupta A, Mayer EA. Gut Microbiome and Obesity: A Plausible Explanation for Obesity. Current Obesity Reports. 2015. In press.

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Elaine Hsiao, PhD
Elaine Hsiao, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, De Logi Chair in Biological Sciences, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
View Bio
Website: Hsiao Lab

Dr. Elaine Y. Hsiao is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology at UCLA, where she leads a laboratory studying fundamental interactions between the microbiome, brain and behavior, and their applications to neurological disorders. Her studies on the relationships between the microbiota, immune system and nervous system led her to discover that the microbiota can regulate behavioral, metabolic and gastrointestinal abnormalities relevant to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Her work in this area, and on neuroimmune interactions in autism, has led to several honors, including the National Institutes of Health Director’s Early Independence Award, distinction as Forbes’ 30 Under 30 in Science and Healthcare, National Geographic’s Emerging Explorer Award and fellowships from the National Institute of Mental Health and Autism Speaks. Inspired by this interplay between the microbiota and nervous system, the Hsiao laboratory is mining the human microbiota for microbial modulators of host neuroactive molecules, investigating the impact of microbiota-immune system interactions on neurodevelopment and examining the microbiome as an interface between gene-environment interactions in neurological diseases.

Selected References

Yano JM, Yu K, Donaldson G, Shastri G, Ma L, Ann P, Nagler C, Ismagilov RF, Mazmanian SK, Hsiao EY (2015) Indigenous bacteria from the gut microbiota regulate host serotonin biosynthesis. Cell, 161:264-76.

Hsiao EY, McBride SW, Hsien S, Sharon G, Hyde ER, McCue T, Codelli JA, Chow J, Reisman SE, Petrosino JF, Patterson PH*, Mazmanian SK* (2013) The microbiota modulates behavioral and physiological abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Cell, 155:1451-1463.

Hsiao EY, McBride SW, Chow J, Mazmanian SK, Patterson PH (2012) Modeling an autism risk factor in mice leads to permanent immune dysregulation. PNAS 109:12776-81

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Jonathan Jacobs, MD, PhD
Jonathan Jacobs, MD, PhD
Clinical Instructor of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
View Bio
Phone: (310) 825-9333Website: Jacobs Laboratory

Dr. Jonathan Jacobs is a Clinical Instructor in the Division of Digestive Diseases within the UCLA Department of Medicine. His research background is in immunology and the intestinal microbiome. He originally trained under Diane Mathis and Christophe Benoist at Harvard, where he published three first author papers on the immunopathological mechanisms of arthritis in an autoantibody-mediated model. He later joined Jonathan Braun’s lab at UCLA to investigate the interactions of the mucosal immune system and the intestinal microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). He utilized human cohorts and transgenic mice to demonstrate that the IBD-associated genes RORC and TL1A, both involved in mucosal immunity, garden the intestinal microbiome. This raises the possibility that genetic risk factors promote IBD through their effects on the microbiome. An ongoing human cohort study with Dr. Braun aims to define the microbial and metabolomics features of IBD in the colonic mucosa and to characterize their relationship to IBD-associated genetic polymorphisms. In a separate translational study, he found that healthy relatives of pediatric IBD patients could be classified by their intestinal microbial and metabolomics profiles into “enterotypes” and “metabotypes” that may predict their future risk for IBD. He has authored a review article, a commentary, and two textbook chapters on intestinal host-microbiome interactions. His current research employs in vivo models and multi’omics analysis of IBD cohorts to define the role of IBD-associated genes in shaping the intestinal microbiome and to identify microbial products that promote IBD.

Selected References

Jacobs JP, Lin L, Goudarzi M, Ruegger P, McGovern DPB, Fornace AJ, Borneman J, Xia L, Braun J. Microbial, metabolomic, and immunologic dynamics in a relapsing genetic mouse model of colitis induced by T-synthase deficiency. Gut Microbes. In press.

Jacobs JP, Goudarzi M, Singh N, Tong M, McHardy IH, Ruegger P, Asadourian M, Moon B, Ayson A, Borneman J, McGovern DPB, Fornace AJ, Braun J, Dubinsky M. A Disease-associated Enterotype and Metabotype in Healthy Relatives of Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients. Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2016 Nov; 2(6):750-66.

Jacobs JP, Braun J. Immune and genetic gardening of the intestinal microbiome. FEBS Letters. 2014 Nov; 588(22):4102-11.

Complete Publications List

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/browse/collection/48438874/

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Lisa Kilpatrick, PhD
Lisa Kilpatrick, PhD
Assistant Researcher, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress
View Bio
Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0547Fax: (310) 825-1919

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Jennifer Labus, PhD
Jennifer Labus, PhD
Director, Neuroimaging and Biostatistics Core, Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Associate Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
View Bio
Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0738

Dr. Jennifer S. Labus is an Associate Professor in the David GeffenSchool of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles. She is an investigator and Director for the Neuroimaging and Bioinformatics Core in the Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress at UCLA. Her research is focused on the interface of stress, pain and emotions and its influence on the role of dysregulation in the pathophysiology of common chronic pain disorders. She has unique expertise in applying advanced statistical and computational technologies to analyze multimodal brain imaging data. She has made seminal contributions to mapping neural networks underlying visceral pain. Dr. Labus’ current research focus lies in applying a biological system based approach using bioinformatics, network analyses, supervised and unsupervised machine learning tools to integrate multimodal brain imaging data with other large scale biological data sets including genetics and metabolomics. This research provides the means to integrate and decipher large amounts of multivariate neuroimaging data to subgroup patients based on objective biological markers, and characterize central nervous system alterations for further pathophysiological investigations targeting treatment of chronic pain and obesity. She has been the recipient of a K08 Career Development award, Effective connectivity of central response in irritable bowel disorder, from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) as well as a RO3 award examining the role of altered attention and emotional arousal networks in IBS. Recently, acting as lead Co-Primary investigator she was awarded R01 funding by the National Institute of Childhood Health and Human Development (NICHD) to use brain imaging data, along with genetic, physiological and biological data, to extensively phenotype women with vulvodynia. Dr. Labus is a co-investigator on several NIH funded grants, international research collaborations, and is actively involved in mentoring graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. As a result of her work she was awarded the Master’s Award in Gastroenterology in 2010 for her outstanding achievements in Basic and Clinical Digestive Sciences. Dr. Labus was also the recipient of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacolgy Travel Award in 2013.

Selected References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/labusjs

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Emeran A. Mayer, MD, PhD
Emeran A. Mayer, MD, PhD
Director, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
View Bio
Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Emeran Mayer is a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Executive Director of the Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, and Co-director of the CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center at UCLA. He is a world renowned gastroenterologist and neuroscientist with 30 years of experience in the study of clinical and neurobiological aspects of how the digestive system and the nervous system interact in health and disease, and his work has been continuously supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He is currently principal investigator on 4 NIH grants including a center grant from ORWH/NIDDK on sex differences in brain gut interactions, a consortium grant by NIDDK on pelvic pain syndromes, a RO1 grant on the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on brain signatures in IBS and a ROI grant on brain gut microbiome interactions in inflammatory and functional GI disorders (both from NIDDK). He has published over 320 peer reviewed articles (average H index 90), including 100 chapters and reviews, co-edited four books, and organized several interdisciplinary symposia in the area of visceral pain and mind body interactions. His current research focus is on the role of the gut microbiota in brain gut interactions in emotion regulation, chronic visceral pain and in obesity.

Selected References:

Complete reference list: https://scholar.google.com/mayerea

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Bruce Naliboff, PhD
Bruce Naliboff, PhD
Director, Pain Research Program, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
View Bio
Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-0494Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Naliboff received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and interned at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. During his tenure at UCLA and the VA he has served as senior psychologist in the UCLA and VA Pain Management programs and Health Psychology Consultation services. Dr. Naliboff’s research has focused on psychophysiological mechanisms of stress and pain and includes studies of stress effects on the immune system, glucose regulation in diabetes, and cardiovascular variables. In the area of pain, he has utilized experimental pain procedures to study perceptual processes in chronic pain states such as chronic back pain, headache, and visceral pain. He has also studied psychosocial and personality variables in chronic pain and especially their impact on treatment choice and outcome. His work in functional gastrointestinal disorders and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) include perceptual, autonomic, and brain imaging studies of visceral sensation, and the role of psychosocial variables in the presentation, course and treatment of IBS. A major emphasis of his current work is the relationship between central stress mechanisms and both somatic and visceral pain disorders. Another area of interest is in the relationship between anxiety and symptoms in chronic pain disorders. Dr. Naliboff has NIH funding to study gender differences in central responses to visceral sensation as well as the role of visceral specific anxiety in irritable bowel syndrome. He has recently begun a clinical trial comparing several psychological treatments for IBS and has an ongoing clinical trial of opioid medications in chronic pain. He serves as a consulting editor for numerous scientific publications in psychology and medicine and on national and international committees as a grant reviewer and program consultant.

Selected References:

Naliboff BD, Solomon GF, Gilmore S, Benton D, Fahey JL, Pine J. Rapid changes in cellular immunity following a confrontational role-play stressor. Brain Behavior and Immunity. 1995; 9: 207-219.

Naliboff BD, Munakata J, Fullerton S, Gracely R, Kodner A, Harraf F, Mayer EA. Evidence for two distinct perceptual alterations in irritable bowel syndrome. Gut. 1997; 41: 505-512.

Naliboff BD, Derbyshire SWG, Munakata J, Berman S, Mandelkern M, Chang L, Mayer EA. Cerebral activation in irritable bowel syndrome patients and controls subjects during rectosigmoid stimulation. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2001; 63: 365-375.

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Claudia Sanmiguel, MD
Claudia Sanmiguel, MD
Program Director, Ingestive Behavior and Obesity Program; Clinical Instructor of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, UCLA
View Bio
Address CHS 42-210 MC737818 10833 Le Conte Avenue Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192

Dr. Sanmiguel was born into a loving and hard working family in Bogota, Colombia. Her parents and two sisters taught her the value of working hard for what you want to achieve in life, to respect each person for his/her own merits and to cherish each moment that you spend with your loved ones. For her, it has been a long and exciting journey from her first day at school in all girls school in Bogota, to her current position as Assistant Professor at one of the best schools of Medicine in the United States. Dr Sanmiguel is the Director of the Ingestive Behavior and Obesity Program at the CNSR . The UCLA Digestive Diseases Division and the CNSR provided her with the opportunity to clinically practice medicine, as well as lead an obesity-research team in a cutting-edge environment looking for answers into the effects of gut-brain axis on eating behaviors and body weight control. “We want to understand the mechanisms behind how the human brain interprets hunger and fullness signals and helps us to make food choices. We believe that if we understand how the gut-brain axis works in regulating eating behaviors and body weight, we can come up with innovative therapies for obesity and other eating disorders.”

Claudia graduated at the top her class at one of the most prestigious Medical Schools in Colombia and went on specializing in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology. Her potential attracted a world class laboratory on gastrointestinal motor function research, and took her from her beloved nation and family to far off Canada to participate in a multidisciplinary team aiming for the development of diagnostic tools and therapeutic devices using electrical stimulation of gut. “ I am grateful for the extraordinary support and guidance from my mentors at the University of Alberta. They show me the importance of having an open mind, to be innovative, to appreciate multidisciplinary work and to learn from failures to come up with different approaches to solve problems.”

She went back to Colombia to a prestigious academic position at Pontificia Universidad Javeriana School of Medicine where she participated in patient care as well as in the training of undergraduate and postgraduate medical students. However, she “felt the itch to go back to the research environment and to be part of a team looking for answers to everyday medical problems”. She returned to Canada and then moved to the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, where Dr. Sanmiguel was part of a team investigating gut-brain signaling and its implications for the treatment of obesity and motility disorders. This line of research brought her to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles along with her mentor, Dr Edy Soffer. Their work resulted in innovative therapies that are the basis for current devices being used to treat obesity and acid reflux in humans. She moved on to complete her medical training in the US, in Internal Medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and in Gastroenterology at the University of California Los Angeles, where the groundbreaking work of Emeran Mayer, MD, head of UCLA’s Center for the Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, had always intrigued Dr. Sanmiguel. “I believe Dr Mayer is a visionary and his work has paved the road for novel approaches to understanding the role of the brain as a crucial, but frequently forgotten, component in many disease processes. I feel very fortunate to get to work with him and his team.”

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Catia Sternini, MD
Catia Sternini, MD
Professor, Department of Medicine Digestive Diseases/Gastroenterology, Neurobiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA
View Bio
Address 650 Charles E, Young Dr. South Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-825-6526Lab Phone: 310-825-5483

The “Brain in the Gut” and Taste Receptors

My research program is concerned with the neuronal circuits that control gastrointestinal motility and the mechanisms that govern receptor-mediated responses in the enteric nervous system, the “brain in the gut”, and with chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, the main lines of my research include: (1) trafficking and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors induced by physiological and pathophysiological events with an emphasis on µ opioid receptor, the target of opioid analgesics used for pain control, which mediates opioid bowel syndrome and tolerance, and (2) role of taste signaling molecules in the regulation of gastrointestinal functions and feeding behavior. My group was the first to demonstrate that opioids differing in their ability to induce tolerance also differ in their efficiency to induce µOR trafficking, a process that regulates receptor signaling and function. The findings of ligand-selective and stimulation-dependent µOR internalization in enteric neurons are of importance for understanding the mechanisms underlying intracellular adaptations induced by prolonged activation of µORs, which hamper the use of opioids as analgesics. Furthermore, we have shown that µOR activation exerts a protective effect on acute intestinal inflammation through cytokine and NF-KB modulation. Another focus of my research is on the role of taste signaling molecules as chemosensory receptors in the gut mucosa, which are likely to modulate gut function and food intake through the release of signaling molecules by enteroendocrine cells, with emphasis on bitter taste receptors, a putative side of defense from potentially toxic substances, drugs and pathogens. The recent discovery that taste receptors for sweet and bitter are expressed throughout the body and not only in the tongue has given rise to the concept of a broader role for these receptors beyond “taste”. My lab has shown that taste signaling molecules are expressed by distinct populations of mucosal cells, including enteroendocrine cells, which synthesize peptides affecting motility, secretion, satiety and hunger, and that bitter taste receptors are regulated by feeding and different diets, suggesting they participate in the functional detection of intraluminal content and they serve as regulators of diet-induced responses by detecting changes in the microbiota.

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio
Photo of Kirsten Tillisch, MD
Kirsten Tillisch, MD
Director, Mind Body Research Program, Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
View Bio
Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 267-0537Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279

Dr. Kirsten Tillisch completed her undergraduate work at the Otis Institute of Parsons School of Design, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honors. She obtained her medical degree from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and was elected to the medical honor society Alpha Omega Alpha. She continued on at UCLA to complete her training in internal medicine and gastroenterology, graduating in 2003. Her clinical interests are functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and cyclic vomiting syndrome. Her research interests include brain-gut interactions , the effects of nonpharmacological therapies on functional gastrointestinal disorders, and pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Her recent research projects include defining resting state brain dysfunction in irritable bowel syndrome patients, evaluating the role of gut microbiota modulation on emotional processing in the brain, and assessment of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists effects on the gut and brain in irritable bowel syndrome. She is a member of the Neuroimaging Program of the Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress.

Selected References:

Mayer EA, Tillisch K, Gupta A. Gut/brain axis and the microbiota. J Clin Invest. 2015 Mar 2;125(3):926-38. doi: 10.1172/JCI76304. Epub 2015 Feb 17. Review. PubMed PMID: 25689247; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4362231.

Mayer EA, Knight R, Mazmanian SK, Cryan JF, Tillisch K. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience. J Neurosci. 2014 Nov 12;34(46):15490-6. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3299-14.2014. Review. PubMed PMID: 25392516; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4228144.

Mayer EA, Padua D, Tillisch K. Altered brain-gut axis in autism: comorbidity or causative mechanisms? Bioessays. 2014 Oct;36(10):933-9. doi: 10.1002/bies.201400075. Epub 2014 Aug 22. Review. PubMed PMID: 25145752.

Tillisch K, Labus JS. Neuroimaging the microbiome-gut-brain axis. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2014;817:405-16. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0897-4_18. Review. PubMed PMID: 24997044.

Tillisch K. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans. Gut Microbes. 2014 May-Jun;5(3):404-10. doi: 10.4161/gmic.29232. Epub 2014 May 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 24838095; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4153780.

Tillisch K, Labus J, Kilpatrick L, Jiang Z, Stains J, Ebrat B, Guyonnet D, Legrain-Raspaud S, Trotin B, Naliboff B, Mayer EA. Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity. Gastroenterology. 2013 Jun;144(7):1394-401, 1401.e1-4. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043. Epub 2013 Mar 6. PubMed PMID: 23474283; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3839572.

Submit changes for this bio

Close Bio