Imaging Genetics

Imaging Genetics

While investigations of epidemiology and genetics based on symptom-related phenotypes has yielded disappointing results in many polygenetically determined diseases, including functional gastrointestinal disorders, the efforts to combine these lines of investigations with neuroimaging approaches have resulted in provocative insights and major advances in the understanding of common polygenic disorders. In the causal chain from gene to protein to mental function, brain network activity is likely to be a key intermediate phenotype that can bridge the gap between genes and clinical phenotype. Parallel independent components analysis has recently been shown to be useful for fusing neuroimaging data with genetic data from large SNP arrays. The advantage of this technique is that it is model free, offering a powerful and versatile data-driven approach for studying relationships between genetics and brain network activity.

Selected References:

  1. Saito, Y.A., N. Mitra, and E.A. Mayer, Genetic Approaches to Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Gastroenterology, 2010.PMID: 20176021
  2. Park, M.I. and M. Camilleri, Genetics and genotypes in irritable bowel syndrome: implications for diagnosis and treatment. Gastroenterol Clin North Am, 2005. 34(2): p. 305-17. PMID: 15862937
  3. Liu, J., G. Pearlson, A. Windemuth, G. Ruano, N.I. Perrone-Bizzozero, and V. Calhoun, Combining fMRI and SNP data to investigate connections between brain function and genetics using parallel ICA. Hum Brain Mapp, 2009. 30(1): p. 241-55. PMID: 18072279 PMCID: PMC2668960
  4. Calhoun, V.D., J. Liu, and T. Adali, A review of group ICA for fMRI data and ICA for joint inference of imaging, genetic, and ERP data. Neuroimage, 2009. 45(1 Suppl): p. S163-72. PMID:19059344 PMCID: PMC2651152