Members of the Center for Neurobiology of Stress fall into one or more of the following categories: (1) investigators at UCLA, VAGLAHS, Ohio State University, University of Pittsburgh, or other campus who are principal or co-principal investigators with peer-reviewed, competitive funding for research in neurovisceral sciences, gastrointestinal disorders, urological disorders, and stress neurobiology, and stress-immune system interactions, particularly related to sex-based differences and whose research directly impacts the goals of the Center; (2) division chiefs in gastroenterology, urology, obstetrics and gynecology, and psychiatry; (3) directors or co-directors of programs or cores, or individuals who have relevant roles within the Center and (4) clinicians who have made significant contributions to the main subject matters of the Center.

If you are interested in becoming a member, please contact Million Mulugeta, DVM, PhD at mmuluget@ucla.edu.

Members are listed in alphabetical order.


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A

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Jeffrey Alger, PhD
Professor, Departments of Neurology and Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA 660 Charles E. Young Drive South Los Angeles CA 90085 Phone: (310) 206-3344

Dr. Jeffry R. Alger received a PhD in biophysical chemistry under the direction of Professor James H. Prestegard at Yale University in 1979. Dr. Alger’s PhD dissertation research focused on nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization transfer. He did postdoctoral training on multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of cells and living animals in the Yale Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry between 1979 and 1984 under the direction of Dr. Robert G. Shulman. During his appointment as assistant professor in the Yale Department of Radiology (1984-1986), he participated in the design and construction of the first Magnetic Resonance Center at the Yale University School of Medicine. From 1986 until 1994, Dr. Alger was a staff scientist, and later a section chief, at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Maryland. During this period he performed some of the first proton MRS studies of human brain cancer and was an early pioneer in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of stroke. In 1994, Dr. Alger moved to Los Angeles and became a faculty member at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the Department of Radiology and in the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center. He was promoted to the rank of Professor in July 2000. His primary faculty appointment moved to the UCLA Department of Neurology in 2005. His current research lies in neuroscience imaging applications of MRI with focus on MRS, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion imaging. A general research goal is to develop magnetic resonance biomarkers that can assess neurological diseases and disorders. He collaborates with teams doing clinical trials and clinical research studies involving stroke, traumatic brain injury, cerebral neoplasia, multiple sclerosis and HIV dementia. In 2007 his laboratory acquired a 7 T 30 cm MRI system which is being used to pursue analogous research in animal models. Dr. Alger has co-authored more than 140 peer-reviewed publications. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and by private foundations. Dr. Alger is affiliated with UCLA’s Interdepartmental Program in Biomedical Physics where he teaches graduate level courses in human anatomy and medical imaging. He also supervises the dissertation research of medical physics PhD students.

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John Allman, PhD
Frank P. Hixon Professor of Neurobiology, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology
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Peter A. Anton, MD
Director, Mucosal Immunology Core (CFAR) UCLA Center for HIV Prevention Research (CPR); Professor, Department of Medicine Digestive Diseases/Gastroenterology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 2734 MRL 701922 Los Angeles CA 90024 Phone: (310) 825-1597Fax: (310) 267-2571

Dr. Anton is the Director of the UCLA Center for HIV and Digestive Diseases and co-Director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Center at UCLA. Dr. Anton’s research is in the field of mucosal immunology and was initially directed toward identifying mechanisms underlying the neuroimmunomodulatory responses in IBD. His expertise in T cell acquisition from endoscopic biopsies and interest in the mucosal immune system has been applied to the area of HIV pathogenesis. This has entailed optimizing assays for isolating mucosal T cells for phenotypic analysis by flow and quantitating HIV viral burden in the tissue (both HIV RNA and DNA). His current research uses these assays and other developing indices of mucosal immune response to assess (i) the degree of mucosal inflammation and altered co-receptor expression associated with HIV infection (and associated therapeutic interventions) and (ii) the potential use of the mucosa as a route of HIV immunization. Dr. Anton is active in the NIH-sponsored AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), Mucosal Immunology Focus Group, and in efforts to clarify the role of compartments in HIV pathogenesis.

Selected References:

Cole SW, Kemeny ME, Weitzman OB, Schoen M, Anton PA. Socially inhibited individuals show heightened DTH response during intense social engagement. Brain, Behavior and Immunity. 1999; 13:187-200.

Rawsthorne P, Shanahan F, Cronin NC, Anton PA, Löfberg R, Bohman L, Bernstein CN. An international survey of the use and attitudes regarding alternative medicine by patients with inflammatory bowel disease. American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1999; 94:1298-1303.

Goode T, O’Connell J, Anton P, Wong H, Reeve J, O’Sullivan GC, Collins JK, Shanahan F. Neurokinin-1 receptor expression in inflammatory bowel disease: molecular quantitation and localisation. Gut (England). 2000; 47(3):387-96.

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Arthur Arnold, PhD
Director, Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute; Distinguished Professor, Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology, UCLA
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Address Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology Terasaki Life Sciences Building Rooom 1129 610 Charles Young Drive South Los Angeles CA 90095-7239 Phone: (310) 825-2169Lab Phone: (310) 825-9340Website: Art Arnold Laboratory

We study the biological origins of sex differences, especially in the brain. All sex differences stem from the differential effects of genes on the sex chromosomes. We study the direct efffects of sex chromosome genes on the brain and other cells, differences caused by X- and Y-linked genes. We also study the indirect effects of these genes, for example the powerful sex-specific effects of gonadal hormones. Our studies focus on two model systems in songbirds and mice. We exploit mouse models in which gonadal sex (testes vs. ovaries) is independent of sex chromosome complement(XX vs. XY). In songbirds, we study the neural circuit for song, which is structurally much different in males and females. We also study the basic properites of sex chromosomes in birds, and mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation.

Selected References:

Gatewood JD, Wills A, Shetty S, Xu J, Arnold AP, Burgoyne PS, Rissman EF. 2006. Sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex influence aggressive and parental behaviors in mice Journal of Neuroscience 26: 2335-2342 .

Itoh Y, Kampf K, Arnold AP. 2006. Assignment of human X chromosome-syntenic genes to a zebra finch microchromosome by in situ hybridization of BAC clones Cytogenetic and Genome Research 112: 343-344 .

Xu J, Taya, S, Kaibuchi K, Arnold AP.. 2005. Spatially and temporally specific expression in mouse hippocampus of Usp9x, a ubiquitin-specific protease involved in synaptic development. Journal of Neuroscience Research 80: 47-55 .

Itoh Y, Arnold AP. 2005. Chromosomal polymorphism and comparative painting analysis in the zebra finch Chromosome Research 13: 47-56 .

Palaszynski KM, Smith DL, Burgoyne PS, Arnold AP, Voskuhl RR. 2005. A yin-yang effect between sex chromosomes and sex hormones on the immune response Endocrinology 146: 3280-3285 .

Chen X, Agate RJ, Itoh Y, Arnold AP. 2005. Sexually dimorphic expression of trkB, a Z-linked gene, in early posthatch zebra finch brain Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 102: 7730-7735 .

Xu J, Taya S, Kaibuchi K, Arnold AP. 2005. Sexually dimorphic expression of Usp9x is related to sex chromosome complement in adult mouse brain European Journal of Neuroscience 21: 3017-3022 .

Kim Y-H, Arnold AP.. 2005. Distribution and onset of aldehyde dehydrogenase (zRalDH) expression in zebra finch brain: lack of sex difference in HVC and RA at early posthatch ages Journal of Neurobiology 65: 260-268 .

Xu J, Watkins R, Arnold AP.. 2005. Sexually dimorphic expression of the X-linked gene Eif2s3x mRNA but not protein in mouse brain Gene Expression Patterns 6: 146-155 .

Luo M., Yu Y, Kim H, Kudrna D, Itoh Y, Agate RJ, Melamed E, Goicoechea JL, Talag J, Mueller C, Wang W, Currie J, Sisneros NB, Wing RA, Arnold AP. 2005. Utilization of a zebra finch BAC library to determine the structure of an avian androgen receptor genomic region Genomics 87: 181-190 .

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B

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Lori Birder, PhD
Professor, Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh
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Address A1207 Scaife Hall Pittsburgh PA 15261 Phone: (412) 383-7368Fax: (412) 648-7197

My laboratory is interested in understanding the complexities of urinary bladder epithelial (urothelial) cell function and urothelial cell-neuronal interactions. Our investigations have revealed that the urothelium, a stratified epithelial layer that lines the bladder lumen, might have the capacity to send signals to neighboring cells via the release of chemical mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and ATP.

Our recent identification of a number of functional receptors/ion channels in bladder urothelial cells and the possible involvement of these receptors/ion channels in the release of mediators suggest that these cells exhibit specialized sensory and signaling properties. For example, we recently found that vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) is expressed not only by afferent nerves that form close contacts with urothelial cells, but also by the urothelial cells themselves.

This arrangement would represent a departure from the conventional view of the urothelium as a simple barrier and provide further support for our speculation that the urothelium has “neuron-like” properties and that it may play a role in sensory mechanisms in the urinary bladder. Through an array of experimental approaches that include molecular biology (mouse knockouts; micro array analysis), measurement of transmitters (ATP, NO), Ca2+/confocal imaging techniques and in vivo monitoring of afferent and reflex bladder activity, our goals are to further characterize the properties of urothelial cells.

Elucidation of mechanisms impacting on urothelial function in addition to how pathology may impact on mechanisms of urothelial communication may provide important insight into targets for new therapies for the clinical management of lower urinary tract disorders.

Selected References

Hanna-Mitchell AT, JM Beckel, S Barbadora, AJ Kanai, WC de Groat and LA Birder. Non-neuronal acetylcholine and urinary bladder urothelium. Life Sciences in press.
Chopra B, SE Barrick, S Meyers, JM Beckel, ML Zeidel, AP Ford, WC de Groat and LA Birder. Expression and function of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors in normal and inflamed rat urinary bladder urothelium Journal of Physiology 562:859-871, 2005.

Birder LA, A Wolf-Johnston, CA Buffington, JR Roppolo, WC de Groat and AJ Kanai. Altered inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production in the bladder of cats with feline interstitial cystitis. Journal of Urology 173:625-629, 2005.

Birder LA, HZ Ruan, B Chopra, Z Xiang, S Barrick, CA Buffington, JR Roppolo, AP Ford, WC de Groat and G Burnstock. Alterations in P2X and P2Y purinergic receptor expression in urinary bladder from normal cats and cats with interstitial cystitis. Am J Physiology 287:F1084-1091, 2004.

Birder LA, Y Nakamura, S Kiss, M Nealen, S Barrick, AJ Kanai, E Wang, G Ruiz, WC de Groat, G Apodaca, W Watkins and MJ Caterina. Altered bladder function in mice lacking the vanilloid receptor TRPV1. Nature Neuroscience 5(9):856-890, 2002.

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Susan Bookheimer, PhD
Joaquin Fuster Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA
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Address Center for Cognitive Neurosciences 760 Westwood Plaza, Suite 17-369 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 794-6387

Dr. Susan Bookheimer is Clinical Neuropsychologist and Professor-in-Residence in the UCLA Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Department of Psychology.  She specializes in functional brain imaging with PET and functional MRI. Her work has focused on the organization of language and memory in the brain, in healthy adults and children and in neurologic conditions and developmental disorders. Recent work focuses on understanding the neural basis of social communication deficits in autism using functional MRI, encompassing both verbal and non-verbal communication, and focusing on emotional aspects of social comprehension.

Dr. Bookheimer also maintains active research programs imaging dyslexia, Alzheimer’s disease, and pre-surgical planning in patients with brain lesions such as tumors, arterio-venous malformations, and epilepsy. Dr. Bookheimer received her Bachelors degree in psychology from Cornell University in 1982, and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Wayne State University in 1989. She performed a postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Institutes of Health before coming to UCLA in 1993.

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Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD
Professor of Clinical Sciences and an Adjunct Professor of Urology at The Ohio State University
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Address Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University 0023 Veterinary Medical Center 601 Vernon L. Tharp Street Columbus OH 43210 Phone: (614) 292-3551

C.A. Tony Buffington, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVN, is a Professor of Clinical Sciences and an Adjunct Professor of Urology at The Ohio State University. One of his primary areas of interest is the role of stress and disease in companion animals and humans. His interests have also led him to study clinical nutrition issues in small animal patients as well as lower urinary tract disorders in cats.

He obtained his veterinary degree as well as MS and PhD degrees in nutrition from the University of California, Davis. He is board certified by the American College of Veterinary Nutrition. He is a frequent lecturer and has authored numerous scientific publications and textbook chapters.

Dr. Buffington resides in Ohio with his wife of 40 years, Terre. They currently are “between pets,” their cat having recently passed away at the age of 19. Their son Adam is a captain (and clinical psychologist) in the USAF, and their daughter Amanda is an actor in Los Angeles. Other than his passion for veterinary medicine, Tony is a longtime cycling enthusiast and still competes in time trial races around Ohio.

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Lin Chang, MD
Director, Functional GI Disroders Program, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Lin Chang, MD, is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Neurobiology of Stress at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She is also Director of the Digestive Health and Nutrition Clinic at UCLA. Dr. Chang’s clinical expertise is in functional gastrointestinal disorders which include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic constipation, and functional dyspepsia. Dr. Chang’s research is focused on the pathophysiology of IBS related to stress, sex differences, and neuroendocrine alterations and the treatment of IBS. She is a funded NIH-investigator studying the central and peripheral mechanisms underlying IBS.

She is the recipient of the Janssen Award in Gastroenterology for Basic or Clinical Research and the AGA Distinguished Clinician Award, Dr. Chang has authored more than 70 original research articles, 48 review articles, and 19 book chapters on her specialty interests and is a frequent speaker at national and international meetings. She is a fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association and American College of Gastroenterology, and a member of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Chang serves as an Associate Editor of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. She is a member of the Rome Foundation Board of Directors, the Rome IV Editorial Board and the Rome IV Functional Bowel Disorders Committee. She is President of the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ANMS). She served on the FDA GI Advisory Committee from 2005-2010 which she also chaired.

Selected References

Chang L, Adeyemo M, Karagiannides I, Videlock EJ, Bowe C, Shih W, Presson AA, Yuan PQ, Gong H, Singh S, Cortina G, Licudine A, Tache Y, Pothoulakis C, Mayer EA. Serum and colonic immune markers in irritable bowel syndrome. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012; 107(2):262-72.

Naliboff BD, Kim S, Bolus R, Bernstein CN, Mayer EA, Chang L. Gastrointestinal and Psychological Mediators of Health Related Quality of Life in IBS and IBD: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012;107:451–459..

Bradford K, Shih W, Videlock E, Presson AP, Naliboff BD, Mayer EA, Chang L. Association of early adverse life events and irritable bowel syndrome. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2012;10(4):385-390.

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Gautam Chaudhuri, MD, PhD
Chair and Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 794-7274

Dr. Chaudhuri completed his MBBS from Calcutta University, India and his M.D. from the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences, India. He then obtained a Ph.D. in Pharmacology from London University under the mentorship of Professor Sir John Vane, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 1982. He subsequently completed his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology from the State University of New York at Buffalo and joined UCLA to do a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Following completion of this, he joined the department as an Assistant Professor. Since joining UCLA, he has published extensively on the action of sex steroids and nitric oxide. He, together with Lou Ignarro, Professor of Pharmacology at UCLA and a Nobel Laureate, was a member of one of the first groups to demonstrate that endothelium-derived relaxing factor is nitric oxide. He has in the past and continues at present to be supported by the NIH in the form of two RO1 grants. He has served for 4 years as a member of the Human Embryology and Development Review Group of the NIH program project review groups and for 4 years as a member of the Maternal and Child Health Committee of the NICHD. Recently, he was appointed as a member of the Advisory Council of the NICHD.

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Marie-Francoise Chesselet, MD, PhD
Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Neurobiology; Interim Chair of the Department of Neurology at UCLA
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Address UCLA Neuro / Neurobiology BOX 951769, B-114 RNRC Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 267-1781

Marie-Françoise Chesselet is the Charles H. Markham Professor of Neurology, distinguished Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Neurobiology, and Interim Chair of the Department of Neurology at UCLA. After receiving the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in Paris, France, she held research positions in France and faculty positions at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and the University of Pennsylvania, before joining UCLA in 1996. At UCLA, Dr. Chesselet chaired the Department of Neurobiology from 2002 to 2013 and is currently the Director of the Integrative Center for Neural Repair, which includes the Center for the Study of Parkinson’s Disease at UCLA she created in 1998. She has directed the NINDS-funded UCLA UDALL Center for Parkinson’s disease research from 1998 to 2013, the NIEHS-funded UCLA Center for Gene Environment in Parkinson’s Disease from 2002 to 2014, and the UCLA Advanced Center for Parkinson’s Disease Research of the American Parkinson Disease Association since 1998. Dr. Chesselet has directed graduate programs at the University of Pennsylvania and UCLA and has directed the NINDS-funded Training Program in Neural Repair from 1998 to 2014. Her laboratory conducts research on the molecular mechanisms of disorders of the basal ganglia and new treatments for Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Her work has been extensively supported by the NIH, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, Cure HD Initiative, and several bio pharmaceutical companies. She currently holds grants from the Department of Defense, CIRM, and Tsumura Inc. Dr. Chesselet is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and currently chair its section on Neuroscience. She just completed a 4 years term on the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council.

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Mark Cohen, PhD
Professor in-Residence, Cognitive Psychology, UCLA
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Home UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior UCLA School of Medicine, Room C9-420 760 Westwood Plaza Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 980-7453

 

Mark Cohen’s training is equal parts engineering and neuroscience. His contributions include his critical role in the development of practical echo-planar scanning, ultra-fast MRI applications, contrast-based and BOLD functional MRI, applications of linear systems analysis to increase fMRI sensitiivity and resolution, and concurrent recordings of EEG and fMRI to better understand brain dynamics and distributed processing. He and his lab have contributed to an understanding of the power of pattern recognition and machine learning to both interpet/classify neural data and as a source of discovery of the processes that result in cognition, perception, emotion and pathology.

Cohen is passionate about graduate and post-graduate education. As the creator and director of the UCLA/Semel NeuroImaging Training Program he has pushed his students to an integrative understanding of the role of imaging in neuroscience: The use of images as hypothesis tests, the relationship between blurring, convolution, statistical error and inference from images, and an understanding of the structures common to neuroimages regardless of imaging modality.

His current focus now includes inquiry into the broader problems of images, beyond neuroscience, to encompass astronomy and nanoscale imaging, aesthetics to statistics, dimensional compression and dimensional expansion.

Cohen holds appointments in the UCLA Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, Psychology and Biomedical Physics and is a member of the California NanoSystems Institute.

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Ian Cook, MD
Director of the UCLA Depression Research and Clinic Program at the Semel Institute; Chief of the TMS Treatment Service in the Department of Psychiatry
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Address Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA 760 Westwood Plaza Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-825-0248

Ian A. Cook, M.D. holds the Joanne and George Miller and Family Endowed Chair in Depression Research. He is a Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences in the David Geffen School of Medicine, and a Research Scientist at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. Dr. Cook received his bachelors degree with high honors from Princeton University and his medical degree from the Yale University School of Medicine. He completed his psychiatry residency training at UCLA’s Neuropsychiatric Institute, where he also was an NIMH-funded research fellow. Dr. Cook served on the Executive Committee on Practice Guidelines of the American Psychiatric Association, and guided the electronic dissemination of their evidence-based guidelines in psychiatry. A board-certified Psychiatrist, he has also served as an examiner for the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. His biography is profiled in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, and Best Doctors. He is the author of numerous publications on brain function in mental illness and in aging, and holds several patents on biomedical devices and methods.

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Michelle G. Craske, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychology, UCLA
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Phone: (310) 825-8403Fax: (310) 206-5895

Dr. Craske is Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, and Director of the Anxiety Disorders Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles. She has published widely on the topics of fear and anxiety disorders, their etiology, assessment and treatment. She has been the recipient of continuous NIMH funding since 1993 for research projects pertaining to risk factors for phobias, anxiety disorders and depression; attentional biases and psychophysiological fear responding; the translation of basic science of fear extinction to human phobias and mechanisms of exposure therapy; and the development and implementation of treatments for anxiety and related disorders. Dr. Craske was Associate Editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology and is currently Associate Editor for Behaviour Research and Therapy is a Scientific Board Member for the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, and a member of the Anxiety Disorders Work Group for DSM-V.

Selected References:

Craske MG, Wolitzky-Taylor KB, Mineka S, Zinbarg R, Waters AM, Vrshek-Schallhorn S, Epstein A, Naliboff B, Ornitz E. Elevated responding to safe conditions as a specific risk factor for anxiety versus depressive disorders: Evidence from a longitudinal investigation. J Abnorm Psychol. 2011.

Craske MG, Wolitzky-Taylor KB, Labus J, Wu S, Frese M, Mayer EA, Naliboff BD. A cognitive-behavioral treatment for irritable bowel syndrome using interoceptive exposure to visceral sensations. Behav Res Ther. 2011 Jun;49(6-7):413-21. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3100429.

Craske MG, Stein MB, Sullivan G, Sherbourne C, Bystritsky A, Rose RD, Lang AJ, Welch S, Campbell-Sills L, Golinelli D, Roy-Byrne P. Disorder-specific impact of coordinated anxiety learning and management treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;68(4):378-88. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3074172.

Craske MG, Kircanski K, Epstein A, Wittchen HU, Pine DS, Lewis-Fernández R, Hinton D; DSM V Anxiety; OC Spectrum; Posttraumatic and Dissociative Disorder Work Group. Panic disorder: a review of DSM-IV panic disorder and proposals for DSM-V. Depress Anxiety. 2010 Feb;27(2):93-112. Review.

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Eric Esrailian, MD
Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine; Lincy Foundation Chair, Clinical Gastroenterology; Co-Chief of the Division of Digestive Diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address Practice Loction 100 UCLA Medical Plaza #700 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 208-5400

Dr. Esrailian attended the University of California at Berkeley and graduated with a major in Integrative Biology and a minor in English. He subsequently graduated from the Loma Linda University School of Medicine and completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of Southern California.

He was named intern, junior resident, and senior resident of the year during all three years of his residency training. He completed his gastroenterology fellowship at UCLA where he also obtained a Masters of Public Health degree with the assistance of an NIH sponsored training grant. He is also a graduate of the Executive Program in Management from the UCLA Anderson School of Management. Dr. Esrailian served on the Medical Board of California from 2010-2011 after being appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Dr. Esrailian’s primary clinical interests include gastrointestinal endoscopy, inflammatory bowel diseases, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and functional gastrointestinal diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome. In addition to disease areas within gastroenterology and internal medicine, Dr. Esrailian has a particular interest in the development of biomedical innovations, value in health care, medical education, and initiatives towards patient-centered care.

In 2012, the School of Medicine awarded him the Lincy Foundation Chair in Clinical Gastroenterology. He is closely involved in growth strategy and strategic planning efforts for the UCLA Health System and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He also works to facilitate community engagement with a number of other schools and departments within the UCLA campus and its Los Angeles community partners, and he is on the UCLA campus steering committee for the Centennial Campaign.

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Christopher Evans, PhD
Director, Brain Research Institute, Hatos Center for Neuropharmacology; Professor, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA
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Address MacDonald Research Laboratories, Room 2760 675 Charles Young Drive Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-7884Lab Phone: (310) 206-7883Fax: (310) 825-7067

Dr. Chris Evans is currently Director of the UCLA Brain Research Institute and the Stefan Hatos Professor directing the Shirley and Stefan Hatos Center for Neurophamacology in the UCLA Semel Institute. Dr. Evans is also director of a NIH-funded center – The Center for Opioid Receptors and Drugs of Abuse or CSORDA. CSORDA, with continuous NIH funding for over 25 years.

Selected References:

Gioiosa, L. Chen, X. Watkins, R. Klanfer, N. Bryant, C. D. Evans, C. J. Arnold, A. P. Sex chromosome complement affects nociception in tests of acute and chronic exposure to morphine in mice. Horm Behav. 2008; 53(1): 124-30.

Walwyn, W. Evans, C. J. Hales, T. G. Beta-arrestin2 and c-Src regulate the constitutive activity and recycling of mu opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons. J Neurosci. 2007; 27(19): 5092-104.

Kho, S. T. Lopez, I. A. Evans, C. Ishiyama, A. Ishiyama, G. Immunolocalization of orphanin FQ in rat cochlea. Brain Res. 2006; 1113(1): 146-52.

Bryant, C. D. Roberts, K. W. Byun, J. S. Fanselow, M. S. Evans, C. J. Morphine analgesic tolerance in 129P3/J and 129S6/SvEv mice. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2006; 85(4): 769-79.

Walwyn, W. M. Wei, W. Xie, C. W. Chiu, K. Kieffer, B. L. Evans, C. J. Maidment, N. T. Mu opioid receptor-effector coupling and trafficking in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Neuroscience. 2006; 142(2): 493-503.

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Michael Fanselow, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychology, UCLA; Area Chair, Learning and Behavior
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Phone: (310) 206-0247Fax: (310) 206-5895Website: Fanselow Lab

Dr. Fanselow has held academic appointments at Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute and Dartmouth College before coming to UCLA in 1987. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington, where he received the Edwin B Newman Award for Excellence in Research. He has also received the Early Career Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association and the Troland Award from the National Academy of Science for his analysis of basic mechanisms of motivational systems. He is interested in how the neural systems that control fear, pain and recuperation interact with each other to produce both adaptive and maladaptive behavior. He was elected President of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Behavioral Neuroscience and Comparative Psychology and is currently President of the Pavlovian Society.

Selected References:

Fanselow MS, LeDoux JE. Why we think plasticity underlying Pavlovian fear conditioning occurs in the basolateral amygdala. Neuron. 1999; 23:229-232.

Fendt M, Fanselow MS. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical basis of conditioned fear. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 1999; 23:743-760.

Li HH, Yu W-H, Rozengurt N, Zhao H-Z, Lyons KM, Anagnostaras S, Fanselow MS, Suzuki K, Vanier MT, Neufeld EF. Mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B produced by targeted disruption of the gene encoding alpha -N-acetylglucosaminidase. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA. 1999; 96:14505-14510.

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Fawzy Fawzy, MD
FDB Contact/Coordinator and Professor, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences; Associate Director, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA
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Phone: (310) 825-0249

Affiliated with UCLA since 1973, Dr. Fawzy’s main area of research is the interface of psychiatry and medicine, specifically psycho-oncology. Dr. Fawzy has authored 109 published manuscripts, articles and chapters, including “A structured psychiatric intervention for cancer patients: I. Changes over time in methods of coping and affective disturbance,” “A structured psychiatric intervention for cancer patients: II. Changes over time in immunologic measures,” and “Malignant Melanoma: Effects of an early structured psychiatric intervention, coping, and affective state on recurrence and survival 6 years later,” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1990, 1990, 1993, and 2003 respectively; the manual entitled, “A Structured Psychoeducational Intervention for Cancer Patients,” General Hospital Psychiatry, 1994, and “Critical Review of Psychosocial Interventions in Cancer Care,” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1995.

In addition, he has co-edited four books. Dr. Fawzy serves as a consultant to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the American Cancer Society (ACS). He is a member of the review committee for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. Professional societies include: Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine (England), the American Psychiatric Association, the American College of Psychiatrists, the Pacific Rim College of Psychiatrists, and the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Dr. Fawzy is past President of the American Society of Psychiatric Oncology and AIDS, and past President of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS).

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Michael Goldstein, PhD
Faculty Associate, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research; UCLA Associate Vice-Provost for the Healthy Campus Initiative; Professor, Community Health Sciences and Sociology
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Address CHS 21-261 UCLA School of Public Helath Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-825-5116
Michael S. Goldstein, PhD, is a professor of public health (community health sciences) and sociology, and UCLA’s associate vice-provost in charge of the Healthy Campus Initiative. He has also served the campus as interim vice provost for graduate education and dean of the graduate division.A faculty associate at the Center, Goldstein was co-principal investigator and program director of CHIS-CAM, an NCI-funded follow-up study to the 2001 California Health Interview Survey that examines use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among California adults, particularly those with cancer and other chronic illnesses. At UCLA, he teaches graduate courses on complementary and alternative medicine, self-help and self-care.Goldstein’s published research on CAM spans 30 years.During the late 1980s his research examined factors that led conventionally trained physicians to become involved with CAM. In the early 1990s, Goldstein spent two years conducting research at The Wellness Community, a support center for people with cancer that is receptive to many forms of CAM. In the mid-1990s, he was among the very first researchers supported by the Office of Alternative Medicine for his study of patient satisfaction with homeopathic treatment. More recently, he collaborated on a study to compare the impact of treatment confidence on pain and disability among patients with low-back pain treated by either physicians or chiropractors.  His current work deals with the potential for CAM providers to assume a greater role in the provision  of primary care in the nation’s health care system.

Goldstein is the author of two books: The Health Movement: Promoting Fitness in America (Macmillan 1992), and Alternative Health Care: Medicine, Miracle, or Mirage(Temple Univ. 1999). Both strive to understand changes in the way people seek to prevent and respond to serious illnesses, like cancer, as part of broader social and cultural changes in American society.

Goldstein received his doctorate from Brown University and has conducted research on a wide array of topics dealing with the behavior of people with chronic illness.

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Arpana Gupta, PhD
Assistant Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Arpana (Annie) Gupta completed a PhD degree in Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, followed by an APA accredited clinical internship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical Center. After coming to UCLA she joined the neuroimaging and psychophysiological cores at the Center for Neurobiology of Stress in 2012. She is currently Adjunct Assistant Professor, where she specializes in research that investigates the influence of environmental factors on shaping neurobiological phenotypes associated with stress and pain-based diseases such as obesity and functional gastroenterological disorders (FGIDs) [vuvlodynia, irritable bowel syndrome]. Her programmatic line of research broadly defined focuses on the bidirectional interactions between the brain and peripheral factors (in particular immune factors and gut microbiota-related metabolites) and how these interactions are modified by vulnerability (early adversity, race, adult stress, socioeconomic status [SES], diet) and protective (resilience, exercise) factors in contributing to the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders. She is dedicated to using advanced automated and mathematical analytic techniques, which allows her to integrate information from multiple data sources, while accounting for sex and race differences. Her goal is to develop a comprehensive model that provides a powerful and sensitive biomarker that will increase biological readouts of these stress and pain-based disorders, thus bringing to the forefront those individuals who are at increased risk as a result of disadvantaged backgrounds.

Selected References

Gupta A, Mayer EA, Sanmiguel CP, Van Horn JD, Woodworth D, Ellingson BM, Fling C, Love A, Tillisch K, Labus JS. Patterns of Brain Structural Connectivity Differentiate Lean from Overweight Subjects. Neuroimage-Clinical, 2015. 13(7): 506-17. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2015.01.005 [Epub Ahead of Print]. PMCID: PMC4338207.

Mayer EA, Tillisch K, Gupta A. Gut-Brain Axis and the Microbiota. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2015; 125(3): 926-38. doi: 10.1172/JCI76304. [Epub ahead of Print]. PMID: 25689247.

Sanmiguel CP, Gupta A, Mayer EA. Gut Microbiome and Obesity: A Plausible Explanation for Obesity. Current Obesity Reports. 2015. In press.

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Ronald Harper, PhD
Distinguished Professor, Neurobiology, UCLA
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Address UCLA Neurobiology 695 Charles Young Dr S BOX 951763, Suite 78-113 BRI Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-825-5303

Dr. Harper received his doctorate from McMaster University (Ontario, Canada) in 1968, and was later a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anatomy at UCLA. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Neurobiology, UCLA and a member of the UCLA Brain Research Institute. The primary objective of his research program is to determine the neural mechanisms that underlie the control of breathing and cardiovascular action during sleep. His laboratory examines these mechanisms through basic studies of neural functioning in animals and physiological and neural imaging studies of humans with normal and disordered breathing during sleep. The conditions with aberrant breathing and cardiovascular action include the sudden death of infants during sleep in the first six months of life (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, SIDS, crib death), infants who are unable to sustain ventilation during sleep (Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome, CCHS, “Ondine’s Curse”), and adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or heart failure; both of the latter conditions are characterized by severely impaired breathing and cardiovascular control during sleep. Dr. Harper’s publications include over 250 original articles, review articles, chapters and editorials; he has co-edited two books and participated in numerous national and international conferences and symposia. He is the P.I. on two grants, one on physiological development in SIDS and one on the neural control of cardiorespiratory function; he is also a subcontract P.I. on a SCOR Program grant on neural sites mediating obstructive sleep apnea (P.I. Jerome Siegel). He has served as a co-investigator on several grants, including a multi-site training program for basic sleep research (P.I. Michael Chase), a training program in oral-facial motor control (P.I. G. Bernard) and one dealing with sleep disordered breathing and the metabolic syndrome (P.I. M. Saad). He has served on the editorial board of several scientific journals and has served as a consulting reviewer on many leading journals, including Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, Experimental Neurology, Journal of Applied Physiology, Journal of Physiology and American Journal of Physiology. Over the years, he has sponsored or co-sponsored several successful NIH K-series awards (Drs. M. Scher, D. Gozal, U. Rao, M. Woo, E. Pae). Dr. Harper’s principal teaching efforts have been in a professional school course, Functional Neuroanatomy for the first year UCLA Dental School class; he also participates in several Neuroscience and Neurobiology graduate courses throughout the year. Dr. Harper’s laboratory has continued to be as source of innovative procedures for teaching, including 3-D visualization of neural material, partially acquired from his own imaging research efforts, and development of video material on CD-ROM media used to demonstrate neural pathology. Over the years Dr. Harper has trained 12 graduate students and overseen the research for 23 postdoctoral fellows, as well as a number of Student Research Program undergraduates and students from the CARE Program. A substantial portion of his time has been devoted to professional and UCLA service, including the School of Dentistry Faculty Executive Committee, the School of Dentistry Committee, the Chancellor’s Committee on Vivarium Usage and the departmental Committee for Advancement to Professorial Rank.

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Daniel Holschneider, MD
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Department of Cell and Neurobiology, University of Southern California
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Phone: (323) 442-1536Fax: (323) 442-1586

The Laboratory of Vertebrate Functional Brain Mapping has over a decade of experience in imaging of the rodent brain, with expertise in behaviors in rodent models of pain, anxiety, brain injury, and anxiety, as well as in physiologic monitoring (ECG, EMG, EEG, cardiovascular function). The lab uses a variety of techniques in the analyses of the three-dimensional autoradiographic data sets of the rat and mouse brains, including region-of-interest analysis, statistical parametric mapping, as well as functional connectivity. A primary interest has been the development of new methods for functional brain imaging of rodent behaviors as they occur in freely moving animal in normal and pathological states. Ongoing projects examine activation of neural circuits and functional brain reorganization in rat models of visceral pain, traumatic brain injury, ‘Parkinson’s Disease’, and the serotonin transporter knockout mouse.

Selected References:

Wang Z, Ocampo MA, Pang RD, Bota M, Bradesi S, Mayer EA, Holschneider DP “Alterations in Prefrontal-Limbic Functional Activation and Connectivity in Chronic Stress-Induced Visceral Hyperalgesia”, PLoS ONE, 8(3):e59138, 2013, PMID:23527114

Holschneider DP, Guo Y, Wang Z, Roch M, Scremin OU, “Remote brain networks changes after unilateral cortical impact injury and their modulation by acetylcholinesterase inhibition” Journal of Neurotrauma, 30(11):907-919, 2013, PMID:23343118

Wang Z, Myers KG, Guo Y, Ocampo MA, Pang RD, Jakowec MW, Holschneider DP, “Functional reorganization of motor and limbic circuits after forced exercise training in a rat model of bilateral Parkinsonism”, PLoS ONE, 8(11), e80058, 2013, PMID:24278239

Holschneider DP, Wang Z, Pang RD, “Functional connectivity-based parcellation and connectome of cortical midline structures in the mouse: a perfusion autoradiography study”, Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, Jun 11;8:61. doi: 10.3389/fninf.2014.00061, 2014, PMID 24966831

Wang Z, Guo Y, Myers KG, Heintz R, Peng Y-H, Maarek J-MI, Holschneider DP “Exercise alters resting state functional connectivity of motor circuits in Parkinsonian rats,” Neurobiology of Aging, in press

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Elaine Hsiao, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, De Logi Chair in Biological Sciences, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Dr. Elaine Y. Hsiao is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology at UCLA, where she leads a laboratory studying fundamental interactions between the microbiome, brain and behavior, and their applications to neurological disorders. Her studies on the relationships between the microbiota, immune system and nervous system led her to discover that the microbiota can regulate behavioral, metabolic and gastrointestinal abnormalities relevant to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Her work in this area, and on neuroimmune interactions in autism, has led to several honors, including the National Institutes of Health Director’s Early Independence Award, distinction as Forbes’ 30 Under 30 in Science and Healthcare, National Geographic’s Emerging Explorer Award and fellowships from the National Institute of Mental Health and Autism Speaks. Inspired by this interplay between the microbiota and nervous system, the Hsiao laboratory is mining the human microbiota for microbial modulators of host neuroactive molecules, investigating the impact of microbiota-immune system interactions on neurodevelopment and examining the microbiome as an interface between gene-environment interactions in neurological diseases.

Selected References

Yano JM, Yu K, Donaldson G, Shastri G, Ma L, Ann P, Nagler C, Ismagilov RF, Mazmanian SK, Hsiao EY (2015) Indigenous bacteria from the gut microbiota regulate host serotonin biosynthesis. Cell, 161:264-76.

Hsiao EY, McBride SW, Hsien S, Sharon G, Hyde ER, McCue T, Codelli JA, Chow J, Reisman SE, Petrosino JF, Patterson PH*, Mazmanian SK* (2013) The microbiota modulates behavioral and physiological abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Cell, 155:1451-1463.

Hsiao EY, McBride SW, Chow J, Mazmanian SK, Patterson PH (2012) Modeling an autism risk factor in mice leads to permanent immune dysregulation. PNAS 109:12776-81

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Jonathan Jacobs, MD, PhD
Clinical Instructor of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Dr. Jonathan Jacobs is a Clinical Instructor in the Division of Digestive Diseases within the UCLA Department of Medicine. His research background is in immunology and the intestinal microbiome. He originally trained under Diane Mathis and Christophe Benoist at Harvard, where he published three first author papers on the immunopathological mechanisms of arthritis in an autoantibody-mediated model. He later joined Jonathan Braun’s lab at UCLA to investigate the interactions of the mucosal immune system and the intestinal microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). He utilized human cohorts and transgenic mice to demonstrate that the IBD-associated genes RORC and TL1A, both involved in mucosal immunity, garden the intestinal microbiome. This raises the possibility that genetic risk factors promote IBD through their effects on the microbiome. An ongoing human cohort study with Dr. Braun aims to define the microbial and metabolomics features of IBD in the colonic mucosa and to characterize their relationship to IBD-associated genetic polymorphisms. In a separate translational study, he found that healthy relatives of pediatric IBD patients could be classified by their intestinal microbial and metabolomics profiles into “enterotypes” and “metabotypes” that may predict their future risk for IBD. He has authored a review article, a commentary, and two textbook chapters on intestinal host-microbiome interactions. His current research employs in vivo models and multi’omics analysis of IBD cohorts to define the role of IBD-associated genes in shaping the intestinal microbiome and to identify microbial products that promote IBD.

Selected References

Jacobs JP, Braun J. Immune and genetic gardening of the intestinal microbiome. FEBS Letters. 2014 Mar 5; pii: S0014. [PMID: 24613921]

Jacobs J, Braun J. Host genes and their effect on the intestinal microbiome garden. Genome Med. 2014 Dec 17; 6(12):119. [PMID: 25593597]

Jacobs JP, Tong M, McHardy I, Goudarzi M, Ruegger P, McGovern D, Borneman J, Fornace A, Dubinsky M, Braun J. Disease-associated enterotypes and metabotypes in families with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Submitted, 2015.

Complete Publications List

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/browse/collection/48438874/

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Iordanis Karagiannidis, PhD
Assistant Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Dr. Karagiannides received his Bachelor’s degree in Biology at Plymouth State University and his Master’s degree in Genetics at University of New Hampshire. He went on to study in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. During his graduate work, he researched the intrinsic changes in fat cell differentiation with aging and accomplished demonstrating changes in the expression of numerous factors involved in adipocyte differentiation with increasing age in the field of fat tissue physiology.

The main target of his research is to study the extent of abdominal fat tissue involvement in the generation of inflammation during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this research, he found that fat cells respond to proinflammatory stimuli (such as the neuropeptide substance P), shown to be present during IBD, and in turn are able to produce inflammatory cytokines themselves. Such cytokines have also been shown to be involved in IBD pathophysiology. He hopes to ultimately achieve additional results through his research and demonstrate whether fat cells actively participate in the events taking place in the colonic lumen during IBD. As a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard, Dr. Karagiannides received a three-year Fellowship Award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America to investigate the SP-mediated involvement of mesenteric fat tissue in the development of IBD. He joined UCLA in July of 2007 as an assistant researcher and a member of the Center of Inflammatory Bowel Disease at the Division of Digestive Diseases and was recently awarded a two-year Broad Medical Research Program grant to investigate the affects of obesity in colitis-associated changes in the intestine and mesenteric adipose tissue. Dr. Karagiannidis has been publishing his work in high quality journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Gastroenterology, and American Journal of Physiology. Dr. Karagiannides’ work is also consistently presented during the Digestive Disease Week meetings including Posters of Distinction.

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Lisa Kilpatrick, PhD
Assistant Researcher, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0547Fax: (310) 825-1919

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Barbara Knowlton, PhD
Professor and Vice Chair, Psychology, UCLA; Professor, Behavioral Neuroscience; Member, Brain Research Institute Neuroscience GPB Home Area
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Phone: (310) 825-5917

The focus of our lab is the study of the neural bases of memory. We use a number of different approaches, including neuroimaging and testing neuropsychological patients to describe functional differences between memory systems and the brain regions that support different memory processes.

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Jennifer Labus, PhD
Director, Neuroimaging and Biostatistics Core, Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Associate Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0738

Dr. Jennifer S. Labus is an Associate Professor in the David GeffenSchool of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles. She is an investigator and Director for the Neuroimaging and Bioinformatics Core in the Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress at UCLA. Her research is focused on the interface of stress, pain and emotions and its influence on the role of dysregulation in the pathophysiology of common chronic pain disorders. She has unique expertise in applying advanced statistical and computational technologies to analyze multimodal brain imaging data. She has made seminal contributions to mapping neural networks underlying visceral pain. Dr. Labus’ current research focus lies in applying a biological system based approach using bioinformatics, network analyses, supervised and unsupervised machine learning tools to integrate multimodal brain imaging data with other large scale biological data sets including genetics and metabolomics. This research provides the means to integrate and decipher large amounts of multivariate neuroimaging data to subgroup patients based on objective biological markers, and characterize central nervous system alterations for further pathophysiological investigations targeting treatment of chronic pain and obesity. She has been the recipient of a K08 Career Development award, Effective connectivity of central response in irritable bowel disorder, from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) as well as a RO3 award examining the role of altered attention and emotional arousal networks in IBS. Recently, acting as lead Co-Primary investigator she was awarded R01 funding by the National Institute of Childhood Health and Human Development (NICHD) to use brain imaging data, along with genetic, physiological and biological data, to extensively phenotype women with vulvodynia. Dr. Labus is a co-investigator on several NIH funded grants, international research collaborations, and is actively involved in mentoring graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. As a result of her work she was awarded the Master’s Award in Gastroenterology in 2010 for her outstanding achievements in Basic and Clinical Digestive Sciences. Dr. Labus was also the recipient of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacolgy Travel Award in 2013.

Selected References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/labusjs

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Helen Lavretsky, MD
Professor in Residence, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences; Professor in-Residence, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior
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Address 760 Westwood Plaza Rm. 37- 465 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-794-4619

Dr. Helen Lavretsky is a Professor In-Residence in the Department of Psychiatry at UCLA, a geriatric psychiatrist with research interest in geriatric and caregiver depression, as well as complementary and alternative medicine and mind-body approaches to treatment and prevention of mood and cognitive disorders in older adults. She received the 2001-2007 and 2010-2015 Career Development awards from NIMH and other prestigious research awards. Her current research studies include an NIMH-funded randomized trial of methylphenidate augmentation of citalopram to improve clinical and cognitive outcomes in geriatric depression, and the NCCAM funded study of complementary use of Tai-Chi to improve antidepressant response in geriatric depression, as well as a meditation study for family dementia caregivers, and a study of milnacipran for treatment of pain in older adults with rheumatoid arthritis. She has developed an elective rotation in clinical research for Medical Students at UCLA. After receiving her Medical Degree from the Moscow Medical Institute, Dr. Lavretsky performed her residency in Psychiatry at UCLA-San Fernando Valley Residency Program, followed by the UCLA Fellowship in Geriatric Psychiatry, and the national VA Research Fellowship in Neurosciences. She received her Degree of Master of Science in Clinical Research from UCLA in 2004.

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Robert Lemelson, PhD
Co-Vice President and Secretary, The Lemelson Foundation; Research Anthropologist, the Semel Institute of Neuroscience at UCLA
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Phone: 310-454-5904

Robert Lemelson, Ph.D. is an Anthropologist and documentary film maker who received his M.A. from the University of Chicago and his doctoral degree from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He serves as a research anthropologist at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and as an assistant adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology at UCLA.

As an anthropologist and documentary film maker, Dr. Lemelson’s work centers on culture, personal experience, and mental illness in Indonesia and in the United States. He has been creating documentary films in Indonesia since 1997, focusing on the relationship between culture and disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), schizophrenia, and Tourette’s syndrome. In 2007 he founded Elemental Productions, an ethnographic documentary film production company.

In addition, Dr. Lemelson is the founder and president of the Foundation for Psychocultural Research, a non-profit foundation supporting research and training in neuroscience and the social sciences. He also serves as a director of the Lemelson Foundation, promoting innovation of socially beneficial and sustainable technologies to meet basic human needs in countries around the world.

In 2007, Dr. Lemelson began the Lemelson/Society for Psychological Anthropology (SPA) student fellows and conference funds program. The program works to encourage graduate students to pursue fieldwork in psychological anthropology and to support faculty conferences fostering new and creative ideas in psychological anthropology.

 

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Matthew Lieberman, PhD
Professor; SCN Lab Director, UCLA
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Address UCLA Department of Psychology 4611 Franz Hall Box 951563 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-4050Website: http://www.scn.ucla.edu/people/lieberman.html

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Edythe London, PhD
Professor in Residence, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA
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Address 760 Westwood Plaza Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-0606Website: http://londonlab.semel.ucla.edu/

Dr. London received her Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the University of Maryland and her postdoctoral training at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Before coming to UCLA in 2001, she was the Director of the Brain Imaging Center for the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and held faculty appointments at the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine. Dr. London is a Professor-in-Residence in the Departments of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Molecular and Medical Pharmacology. Her work focuses on the use of neuroimaging to study neural circuitry underlying self-control and behaviors related to addiction.

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Sheng-Xing Ma, MD, PhD
Professor in Residence, Obstetrics and Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA; Member, CTSI
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Address 1124 West Carson Street Building RB-1, Room 208 Torrance CA 90502 Phone: (310) 222-1964

Sheng-Xing Ma is a Professor and Director of Integrated Medicine Research Laboratories at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. He was recruited to UCLA as an Assistant Professor in 1996, and he received a promotion to Associate Professor in 2003 and Professor in 2008 in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Dr. Ma has been engaged in the studies of nitrate pharmacology, biochemistry and physiological effects of nitric oxide (NO) for the past 20 years. He has demonstrated that nitroglycerin modifies neuronal excitability, increases norepinephrine release/synthesis in heart and brain, and stimulates noradrenergic activation in the posterior hypothalamus, which contributes to nitrate tolerance and central cardiovascular effects of the drug. Results from his group have found that NO mediates acupuncture-induced cardiovascular and analgesic effects through a novel pathway, the dorsal medullar-thalamic tract. Another novel discovery is that NO-cGMP related biomolecules contribute to biochemical physiological changes in acupoints associated with meridian practices and diseases. He has developed a painless, non-invasive device to biocapture NO, cGMP, and nitrotyrosine from skin surface of acupoints and meridians for studies of signal transduction molecules during physiological and pathological changes, and therapies such as acupuncture, moxibustion, and meditation/Qi Gon.

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Juan Carlos Marvizon, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine – Division of Digestive Diseases, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and The Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress
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Address UCLA Department of Medicine Box 951792 VA-CURE, Bldg 115, Rm 119 Los Angeles CA 90095-1792 Phone: (310) 478-3711 x41847Fax: (310) 268-4963

Dr. Juan Carlos Marvizón is Assistant Professor at the Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.Dr. Marvizón was born in 1957 in Rome, Italy. He majored in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). He received his Ph.D. in 1985 for his work on the glycine receptor at the Severo Ochoa Center of Molecular Biology in Madrid. During 1985, he worked as a research scientist at Pharmuka Laboratoires, a pharmaceutical company in Paris, France, investigating peripheral benzodiazepine receptors. He was then awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to work at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he studied the biochemistry of glycine and GABA receptors in relation to stress, and later became interested in NMDA receptors. From 1989 to 1991, he was faculty at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). Prior to coming to UCLA, he was Research Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles, where he worked with Dr. Michel Baudry on the role of NMDA receptors in learning and memory. Dr. Marvizón came to UCLA in 1994. His current research focuses on the role of NMDA, substance P and opioid receptors in pain. He is the principal investigators of a grant from the NIH to study the release of substance P and opioids in the spinal cord.

Selected References:

Marvizon JCG, Grady EF, Stefani E, Bunnett NW, Mayer EA. Substance P release in the dorsal horn assessed by receptor internalization: NMDA receptors counteract a tonic inhibition by GABAB receptors. Eur. J. Neurosci. 11:417-426, 1999.

Marvizon JCG, Wang X, Matsuka Y, Neubert JK and Spigelman I. Relationship between capsaicin-evoked substance P release and NK1 receptor internalization in the rat dorsal horn. Neuroscience 118: 535-545, 2003.
Lao LJ., Song B and Marvizon JCG. Neurokinin release produced by capsaicin acting on the central terminals and axons of primary afferents: relationship with NMDA and GABAB receptors. Neuroscience 121: 667-680, 2003.

Song B and Marvizon JCG. Peptidases prevent m-opioid receptor internalization in dorsal horn neurons by endogenously released opioids. J. Neurosci. 23: 1847-1858, 2003.

Song B and Marvizón JCG. Dorsal horn neurons firing at high frequency, but not primary afferents, release opioid peptides that produce m-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord. J. Neurosci. 23: 9171-9184, 2003.

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Emeran A. Mayer, MD, PhD
Director, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Emeran Mayer is a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Executive Director of the Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, and Co-director of the CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center at UCLA. He is a world renowned gastroenterologist and neuroscientist with 30 years of experience in the study of clinical and neurobiological aspects of how the digestive system and the nervous system interact in health and disease, and his work has been continuously supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He is currently principal investigator on 4 NIH grants including a center grant from ORWH/NIDDK on sex differences in brain gut interactions, a consortium grant by NIDDK on pelvic pain syndromes, a RO1 grant on the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on brain signatures in IBS and a ROI grant on brain gut microbiome interactions in inflammatory and functional GI disorders (both from NIDDK). He has published over 320 peer reviewed articles (average H index 90), including 100 chapters and reviews, co-edited four books, and organized several interdisciplinary symposia in the area of visceral pain and mind body interactions. His current research focus is on the role of the gut microbiota in brain gut interactions in emotion regulation, chronic visceral pain and in obesity.

Selected References:

Complete reference list: https://scholar.google.com/mayerea

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John Mazziotta, MD, PhD
Vice Chancellor, UCLA Health Sciences; Dean, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; CEO, UCLA Health
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Address Practice Location 300 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite B200 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-825-2699

Dr. John C. Mazziotta assumed the position of Vice Chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences and Dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA on March 1, 2015. Dr. Mazziotta has been a member of the UCLA faculty since 1983. Before his appointment as Vice Chancellor and Dean, he served as Associate Vice Chancellor for health sciences and Executive Vice Dean of the school of medicine. Dr. Mazziotta also has been chair Department of Neurology and director of the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, of which he was the founder.

Dr. Mazziotta earned his MD and PhD in neuroanatomy and computer science from Georgetown University. Following an internship at Georgetown, he completed neurology and nuclear medicine training at UCLA.

Dr. Mazziotta has published more than 260 research papers and eight texts. He has received numerous awards and honors, including the Oldendorf Award from the American Society of Neuroimaging, the S. Weir Mitchell Award and the Wartenberg Prize of the American Academy of Neurology, and the Von Hevesy Prize from the International Society of Nuclear Medicine. Dr. Mazziotta also has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and he is a member of the Royal College of Physicians.

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John McDonald, MD
Professor of Anesthesiology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center; Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center; Professor of Anesthesiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address Harbor/UCLA Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology 1000 West Carson Street Box #10 Torrance CA 90502 Phone: (310) 222-5240

Dr. John McDonald received his M.D. from the University of Iowa in 1964. He completed internship at the University of Oregon in 1965. He completed an Ob/Gyn residency at the University of Iowa in 1968. He completed his second residency in Anesthesiology at the University of Washington in 1970.

His first academic position was at LAC/USC from 1970-1977 as Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology. He co-founded the first neonatal intensive care unit at LAC/USC and was also director of anesthesiology and Respiratory Therapy at Women’s Hospital.

His second academic position was the University of Colorado as Professor and Vice Chairman of Anesthesiology and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1977-1978.

His third academic appointment was at The Ohio State University as Professor and Chairman of Anesthesiology and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1978-1998. He was also appointed as faculty at the Ohio Super-Computer Center 1988.

His fourth academic appointment is at Los Angeles where he is Professor and Chairman of Anesthesiology and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology both at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Dr. McDonald was recruited by founder of the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Dr. Charlie Bender; who believed his presence as faculty would stimulate ideas from the medical viewpoint that would be fresh projects for research and development of new viewpoints of model formulation. This became reality within the next few years with the development of the model of “Virtual Reality Lumbar Epidural”. This provided Dr. McDonald and colleague Don Stredney’s development of an end product that later precipitated their receiving a Smithsonian Award at the 1966 annual Washington D.C. ceremony.

Recent research efforts have focused on development of a unique research group composed of a total of five M.D.s and Ph.D.s. Our work continues to be centered about the confocal scope with the academic focus on pain messaging systems of the rat pelvis bladder, uterus, and colon. Our group has published 4 peer review papers in the past five year period.

Our current focus is development of unraveling of the mystery of pain as it concerns the “intracellular mechanisms”. We believe some of the quandary of inconsistent relief of pelvic pain lies in this medium and we plan to continue our search for some means of understanding this enigmatic major pain problem.

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James McRoberts, PhD
Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Phone: 310-267-4834

Dr. McRoberts’ research focuses on the mechanisms involved in visceral pain, particularly that associated with the GI tract. He uses in vitro biological approaches to examine neurons and neurotransmission at the cellular and molecular level. He also examines behavioral responses to various visceral pain paradigms with an emphasis on stress modulation of pain perception. The specific goal of Dr. McRoberts’ project is to determine the role of peripheral N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) expressed on extrinsic primary afferent nerves in visceral and somatic pain transmission and in the development of peripheral and central sensitization.  Using various molecular techniques and whole cell patch clamp methodology, he has identified the NMDAR subunits expressed by different subtypes of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, characterized the functional and pharmacological properties of these receptors, identified their role in modulating afferent sensitivity to mechanical distension of the colon, demonstrated that NMDARs in DRG neurons regulate voltage-dependent calcium channels through PKC activation, and shown that colonic inflammation leads to persistent up-regulation in NMDAR channels with altered pharmacological properties .  He has also developed mice with tissue specific knock out of NMDARs in DRG neurons and shown that these mice have diminished nociceptive responses during phase 2 of the formalin test, thus demonstrating that these receptors participate in the process of central sensitization. The long-term goal of this research is find better means to control pain of visceral origin in order to help patients with functional bowel diseases such as IBS.

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Paul Micevych, PhD
Distinguished Professor, Head and Neck Surgery; Chair and Distinguished Professor, Neurobiology; Member, Brain Research Institute; Molecular, Cellular & Integrative Physiology GPB Home Area; Neuroscience GPB Home Area
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Phone: 310-206-8265

The reproductive hormones estradiol and progesterone bathe our internal organs. They have profound influence over the central and peripheral nervous system. While these steroids have been studied for many years, recent advances indicate that many actions of estradiol in the nervous system are mediated by receptors located on the cell membrane, suggesting more of a neurotransmitter than a hormonal role. My lab is working to understand the multiple mechanisms and circuits through which estrogen and progesterone affect cell types in different systems to affect reproduction, behavior, pain transmission and neuroprotection.

Research efforts in the Micevych laboratory involve understanding the cellular and molecular events underlying estrogen action on neurons and glial cells. Estrogen has profound effects on cognitive function and neuroprotection, as well as, reproductive functions. Estrogen affects the expression and activity of various neuropeptides and sex steroids. In particular they have focused on regulation mu-opioid and nociceptin receptors in the CNS regulation of sexual behavior. Recent experiments have demonstrated the synthesis of progesterone in the brain, its regulation by estrogen and physiologic functions of neuroprogesterone. RT-PCR and calcium imaging experiments in neurons and astrocytes have been used to elucidate the mechanisms of estrogen rapid signaling in both glial cells and neurons. The Micevych laboratory has demonstrated that estrogen can modulate nociceptive signaling through rapid actions on primary sensory neurons demonstrating a novel mechanism of estrogen modulation of pain. Additionally, the Micevych Laboratory has been studying the neuroprotective action of estrogen in the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Estrogen activates the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) to ameliorate a hallmark of ParkinsonA?s disease A? the neurodegeneration of dopamine neurons. Significantly, estrogen or IGF-1 is efficacious after either central or peripheral administration. Together these experiments underscore the broad range of estrogen signaling influencing both physiology and pathology.

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Holly Middlekauff, MD
Professor of Medicine, UCLA
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Address 200 UCLA Medical Plaza Suite C365 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-825-8811

My research is focused on the derangements of the autonomic nervous system, especially the sympathetic nervous system, in humans with heart failure. I am currently studying the abnormal reflex responses to exercise in heart failure patients, and how these contribute to the overall exercise limitation in heart failure. We are testing the hypothesis that exaggerated sympatho-excitatory responses to exercise in heart failure are mediated by muscle mechanoreceptor sensory nerves, which have been sensitized by ischemic metabolites. A secondary focus of my research is on the effects of acupuncture on the autonomic nervous system.

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Million Mulugeta, DVM, PhD
Associate Director, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center; Adjunct Professor, Department of Medicine Digestive Diseases/Gastroenterology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Dr. Mulugeta focuses on the role of CRF2 receptors (CRF2R) in stress-related alteration of colonic function and visceral pain. His research program tests the hypothesis that CRFR2 activation modulates stress-related neuroenteric physiology, lower gut motor function alterations and stress-related visceral pain of colonic origin. Short term goals are 1) identification of enteric neuron, neuroendocrine and spinal cells expressing the CRF2R and its ligand/s and 2) understanding of the interaction of CRF2R and CRF1R activation during stress. Long-term goals include defining the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the coping response, homeostasis, of the gastrointestinal tract during stress.

Dr Mulugeta has published several papers on the brain-gut interaction and stress related gastrointestinal motility, pain and inflammatory responses. He serves as a peer-reviewer for numerous medical journals, and is on the editorial boards for the Digestive Diseases & Science and the World Journal of Gastroenterology. Dr Mulugeta is recipient of several awards including the 2011 International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders award in basic sciences. Dr Mulugeta’s research is supported by NIH and industry grants.

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Bruce Naliboff, PhD
Director, Pain Research Program, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-0494Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Naliboff received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and interned at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. During his tenure at UCLA and the VA he has served as senior psychologist in the UCLA and VA Pain Management programs and Health Psychology Consultation services. Dr. Naliboff’s research has focused on psychophysiological mechanisms of stress and pain and includes studies of stress effects on the immune system, glucose regulation in diabetes, and cardiovascular variables. In the area of pain, he has utilized experimental pain procedures to study perceptual processes in chronic pain states such as chronic back pain, headache, and visceral pain. He has also studied psychosocial and personality variables in chronic pain and especially their impact on treatment choice and outcome. His work in functional gastrointestinal disorders and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) include perceptual, autonomic, and brain imaging studies of visceral sensation, and the role of psychosocial variables in the presentation, course and treatment of IBS. A major emphasis of his current work is the relationship between central stress mechanisms and both somatic and visceral pain disorders. Another area of interest is in the relationship between anxiety and symptoms in chronic pain disorders. Dr. Naliboff has NIH funding to study gender differences in central responses to visceral sensation as well as the role of visceral specific anxiety in irritable bowel syndrome. He has recently begun a clinical trial comparing several psychological treatments for IBS and has an ongoing clinical trial of opioid medications in chronic pain. He serves as a consulting editor for numerous scientific publications in psychology and medicine and on national and international committees as a grant reviewer and program consultant.

Selected References:

Naliboff BD, Solomon GF, Gilmore S, Benton D, Fahey JL, Pine J. Rapid changes in cellular immunity following a confrontational role-play stressor. Brain Behavior and Immunity. 1995; 9: 207-219.

Naliboff BD, Munakata J, Fullerton S, Gracely R, Kodner A, Harraf F, Mayer EA. Evidence for two distinct perceptual alterations in irritable bowel syndrome. Gut. 1997; 41: 505-512.

Naliboff BD, Derbyshire SWG, Munakata J, Berman S, Mandelkern M, Chang L, Mayer EA. Cerebral activation in irritable bowel syndrome patients and controls subjects during rectosigmoid stimulation. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2001; 63: 365-375.

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Gordon Ohning, MD, PhD
Associate Chief, Gastroenterology, VA GLAHS-West Los Angeles Healthcare Center; Professor, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address VA Greater LA Healthcare System Building 115 115, Room 217 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-1597Lab Phone: 310-268-3936

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Martin Paulus, MD
Professor in Residence, Department of Psychiatry, Laboratory of Biological Dynamics and Theoretical Medicine, University of California, San Diego
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Address 8939 Villa La Jolla Drive Suite 200 La Jolla CA 92037 Phone: 858-534-9444Website: http://koso.ucsd.edu/~martin/index.html

Dr. Paulus studied Medicine at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz from 1979-1985. He received a postdoctoral fellowship from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation) in 1986 to study the effects of calcium antagonists on animal models of mania at the University of California San Diego (UCSD). In 1993, Dr. Paulus left UCSD to resume his medical training and completed his internship at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center / Zucker Hillside Hospital on Long Island, NY. In 1994, he rejoined the Department of Psychiatry at UCSD as a psychiatric resident. Dr. Paulus completed his residency in psychiatry in 1997. At that time, he joined the Department of Psychiatry at UCSD as an Assistant Professor. He also became a staff psychiatrist at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Health Care System (VASDHS). Dr. Paulus is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UCSD and Director of Telemental Health at the VASDHS, which focuses on delivering evidence based psychotherapy to Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. In May 2014, Dr. Paulus joined the Laureate Institute For Brain Research (LIBR) in Tulsa, OK, as the Scientific Director and President.

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Joseph Pisegna, MD
Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Chief, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System
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Address 200 UCLA Medical Plaza Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-1597

Dr. Joseph Pisegna is Professor of Medicine at UCLA and Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. Dr. Pisegna is interested in the molecular pharmacology of hormones and receptors in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the diagnosis and management of islet cell tumors of the pancreas, including the Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome. These research and clinical interests derive from research in the biochemistry and physiology of neuroendocrine tumors. While a fellow at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Pisegna first developed a clinical interest in the Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES), where he discovered and cloned the receptor for gastrin and named it the cholecystokinin B receptor. More recently, Dr. Pisegna has demonstrated that receptors for gastrin are present in the kidney and mediate food-induced regulation of salt excretion. Dr. Pisegna was recruited to the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles and the Center for Ulcer Research and Education (CURE) in 1996. He is a recipient of the VA Career Development Award at the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center. His addition to the faculty of the UCLA Center for Pancreatic Diseases provides unsurpassed expertise in the diagnosis and medical management of pancreatic endocrine tumors.

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Charalabos Pothoulakis, MD
Director of Research, UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Digestive Diseases/Gastroenterology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 675 Charles E. Young Dr. South MRL RM# 1240, Box 957019 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-9104

Dr. Pothoulakis graduated from the Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki Medical School in Greece and he joined the Division of Gastroenterology at Boston University Medical Center as a Research Fellow in Gastroenterology in 1982. After completion of his fellowship he became a faculty member at the Department of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. Dr Pothoulakis joined the Division of Gastroenterology at Beth Israel Medical Center, Harvard Medical School in 1996 as an Assistant Professor and became Professor of Medicine in this institution in 2005. In 2003 he established a “Gastrointestinal Neuropeptide Center” in the Division of Gastroenterology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center that involved a multi-disciplinary approach to study neuropeptide function in the GI tract. During his tenure at Harvard Medical School he has also been a member of the Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition at Massachusetts General Hospital and he was the Director of a NIH Program Project grant that examined the barrier function of the GI Tract in health and disease.

Dr. Pothoulakis’ research program is primarily focused on the role of neuropeptides and hormones in several disease states, including Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Clostridium difficile infection, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. His recent projects also involve the neuropeptide-dependent mechanisms by which communication between the intestinal mucosa and the fat depots affect the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. He is an author of over 165 original articles and numerous reviews and book chapters and served in the Editorial Board of several biomedical journals, including Gastroenterology, and American Journal of Physiology. He was recently elected as the Vice Chair of the Hormones, Transmitters, Growth Factors and Receptors Section of the American Gastroenterological Association, and has been a member of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Section of this Association. In 2005 Dr. Pothoulakis received an honorary degree from Harvard University and he is the recipient of the “Janssen Award in Basic Research in Gastrointestinal Motility” by the American Gastroenterological Association for his discoveries and insights into the function of gastrointestinal neuropeptides. Dr. Pothoulakis’ research projects have been supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, the Broad Foundation, The Martin Blinder Foundation for Crohn’s Disease, and the Knapp Foundation.

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Andrea Rapkin, MD
Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, at the David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA; Director, UCLA Pelvic Pain Clinic
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Address UCLA Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Box 951740, 27-139 CHS Los Angeles CA 90095-1740 Phone: (310) 794-7274Fax: (310) 206-3670

Dr. Rapkin received her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1975. She went on to study medicine at the University of New York in Buffalo where she received her M.D. in 1979. Dr. Rapkin completed a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at UCLA School of Medicine in 1983. She is Board Certified by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (of which she is also a fellow). After obtaining her M.D., she joined the faculty at UCLA and is currently a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She also directs the UCLA Pelvic Pain Clinic. Dr. Rapkin has published extensively in the areas of premenstrual syndrome, chronic pelvic pain and women’s reproductive health, with numerous research articles and contributions to textbooks in the area of menstrual-cycle-related mood disorders and pelvic pain. Dr. Rapkin was one of the first Obstetrician-Gynecologists to adapt the multidisciplinary pain management approach to the evaluation and treatment of women with pelvic and vulvar pain. The clinic includes professionals from the areas of psychology, anesthesiology, and physical therapy and provides patient care, resident medical student education, and a fruitful environment for clinical research.

Selected References:

Payne LA, Rapkin AJ, Lung KC, Seidman LC, Zeltzer LK, Tsao JC. Pain Catastrophizing Predicts Menstrual Pain Ratings in Adolescent Girls with Chronic Pain. Pain Med. 2015 Jul 27.

Akopians AL, Rapkin AJ. Vulvodynia: The Role of Inflammation in the Etiology of Localized Provoked Pain of the Vulvar Vestibule (Vestibulodynia). Semin Reprod Med. 2015 Jul;33(4):239-45.

Rapkin AJ, Lewis EI. Treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Womens Health (Lond Engl). 2013 Nov;9(6):537-56.

Gupta A, Rapkin AJ, Gill Z, Kilpatrick L, Fling C, Stains J, Masghati S, Tillisch K, Mayer EA, Labus JS. Disease-related differences in resting-state networks: a comparison between localized provoked vulvodynia, irritable bowel syndrome, and healthy control subjects. Pain. 2015 May;156(5):809-19.

Rapkin AJ, Mikacich JA. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder and severe premenstrual syndrome in adolescents. Paediatr Drugs. 2013 Jun;15(3):191-202.

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Shlomo Raz, MD
Professor, Department of Surgery Division of Urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA
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Address UCLA Urology BOX 957366 Ste 240, 200 Medl Plz Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 794-0206

Shlomo Raz, M.D. joined UCLA in 1975 and oversees the Division of Female Urology, Reconstructive Surgery and Urodynamics. Dr. Raz has been a recognized leader in developing new treatments for female urology conditions for over 28 years. Dr. Raz pioneered many of the innovations that today are the standards of care worldwide for such conditions as vaginal and uterine prolapse, urinary incontinence, pelvic floor disorders, voiding dysfunction, and surgical reconstruction after cancer for urethral abnormalities.

During the past 28 years at UCLA, Dr. Raz has been committed to the highest standard of care of patients with urologic conditions affecting the lower urinary tract. He is a definite authority and one of the most prominent physicians in the field of female urology and urologic reconstructive surgery.  With his numerous surgical innovations, as well as his involvement in the development of new pharmacological and surgical treatments of urologic conditions, Dr. Raz has helped define the field of female urology and reconstruction for the past two decades. He is author of more than 170 peer reviewed publications, and is author and chief editor of some of the most important texts and surgical atlases used throughout the world to train physicians in female urology and reconstructive surgery.

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Sang Hoon Rhee, PhD
Adjunct Associate Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Dr. Rhee’s research focuses on studying roles of host-microbial interaction in the gastrointestinal tract. Specifically, the lab has been investigating the function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which is a family of pattern recognition receptor recognizing microbial products to elicit inflammatory and innate immune responses. Recently, Dr. Rhee demonstrated that TLR5 is associated with the development and progress of inflammatory bowel diseases. Moreover, Dr. Rhee’s studies also showed that TLR5 plays an important role to elicit innate immunity to regulate anti-tumor activity. Studies to be presented will include a role of TLR5 in regulating colon cancer and a potential mechanism to modulate anti-tumor activity against colonic tumor. This research program has a record of continuous support from the NIH/NIDDK, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute at both UCLA and Harvard Medical School.

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Larissa Rodriguez, MD
Professor of Urology; Director, USC Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive; Surgery, Beverly Hills; Vice Chair, Academics; Director, FPMRS Fellowship at USC
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Phone: (310) 794-0209

Dr. Rodríguez is an established surgeon-scientist with extensive expertise in the field of female pelvic and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) in urology. Dr. Rodríguez is nationally and internationally recognized for her work in the field of stem cell research and tissue engineering.

An awarded researcher, Dr. Rodríguez has developed patented techniques and innovative surgical strategies to provide treatment in areas such as stress incontinence and reconstruction of the bladder and lower urinary tract. Another focus of her research has been the study of the etiology and treatment of urinary incontinence and vaginal prolapse, in which she is active in clinical research and outcomes research as they relate to treatment in these areas.

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Michael Ross, MD, MPH
Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Public Health; Vice Chair, Obstetrics and Gynecology, UCLA
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Home 1000 West Carson Street Box 3 Torrance CA 90502 Phone: (310) 222-1962

Dr. Michael Ross, M.D., MPH is a Founder of Cervilenz, Inc. in 2008, and serves as its Medical Director. Dr. Ross serves as the Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Harbor/UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, California. He has been Member of Clinical Advisory Board for MERIDIAN(TM) Line of Non-Invasive Fetal Heart Rate Monitors at MindChild Medical, Inc. since February 2012. Dr. Ross serves as Vice Chair of Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, California. He has been a Practicing Perinatologist for 25 years. Dr. Ross serves as the Chairman of the Medical Advisory Board at Cervilenz, Inc., and also serves as its Director. Dr. Ross serves on the board of several women’s health companies. He is the co-author of the textbook Fetal Monitoring Interpretation, (Lippicott Williams and Wilkins, 2010).

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Claudia Sanmiguel, MD
Program Director, Ingestive Behavior and Obesity Program; Clinical Instructor of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, UCLA
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Address CHS 42-210 MC737818 10833 Le Conte Avenue Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192

Dr. Sanmiguel was born into a loving and hard working family in Bogota, Colombia. Her parents and two sisters taught her the value of working hard for what you want to achieve in life, to respect each person for his/her own merits and to cherish each moment that you spend with your loved ones. For her, it has been a long and exciting journey from her first day at school in all girls school in Bogota, to her current position as Assistant Professor at one of the best schools of Medicine in the United States. Dr Sanmiguel is the Director of the Ingestive Behavior and Obesity Program at the CNSR . The UCLA Digestive Diseases Division and the CNSR provided her with the opportunity to clinically practice medicine, as well as lead an obesity-research team in a cutting-edge environment looking for answers into the effects of gut-brain axis on eating behaviors and body weight control. “We want to understand the mechanisms behind how the human brain interprets hunger and fullness signals and helps us to make food choices. We believe that if we understand how the gut-brain axis works in regulating eating behaviors and body weight, we can come up with innovative therapies for obesity and other eating disorders.”

Claudia graduated at the top her class at one of the most prestigious Medical Schools in Colombia and went on specializing in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology. Her potential attracted a world class laboratory on gastrointestinal motor function research, and took her from her beloved nation and family to far off Canada to participate in a multidisciplinary team aiming for the development of diagnostic tools and therapeutic devices using electrical stimulation of gut. “ I am grateful for the extraordinary support and guidance from my mentors at the University of Alberta. They show me the importance of having an open mind, to be innovative, to appreciate multidisciplinary work and to learn from failures to come up with different approaches to solve problems.”

She went back to Colombia to a prestigious academic position at Pontificia Universidad Javeriana School of Medicine where she participated in patient care as well as in the training of undergraduate and postgraduate medical students. However, she “felt the itch to go back to the research environment and to be part of a team looking for answers to everyday medical problems”. She returned to Canada and then moved to the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, where Dr. Sanmiguel was part of a team investigating gut-brain signaling and its implications for the treatment of obesity and motility disorders. This line of research brought her to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles along with her mentor, Dr Edy Soffer. Their work resulted in innovative therapies that are the basis for current devices being used to treat obesity and acid reflux in humans. She moved on to complete her medical training in the US, in Internal Medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and in Gastroenterology at the University of California Los Angeles, where the groundbreaking work of Emeran Mayer, MD, head of UCLA’s Center for the Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, had always intrigued Dr. Sanmiguel. “I believe Dr Mayer is a visionary and his work has paved the road for novel approaches to understanding the role of the brain as a crucial, but frequently forgotten, component in many disease processes. I feel very fortunate to get to work with him and his team.”

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David Shapiro, PhD
Professor Emeritus, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA
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Phone: (310) 206-8826

David Shapiro is a psychologist with special interests and research experience in psyhophysiology and health psychology. He directs the Psychophysiology Laboratory in the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. He was appointed Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences in the School of Medicine in 1974 and has also been a member of the Department of Psychology in Arts and Sciences,and he became Professor Emeritus in 1994. From 1953 to 1974 he was on the faculty of Harvard University in the Departments of Psychology and Social Relations and in Psychiatry. His publications include basic research and clinical applications of biofeedback and self-regulation, social and emotional processes affecting cardiovascular regulation and risk for hypertension, psychological factors in smoking. and the psychological benefits of yoga. He has served as Editor of the journal Psychophysiology and on the editoral board of other journals. His research has been honored by the Society for Psychophysiological Research, Society of Behavioral Medicine, and the Society of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeeback.

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Kalyanam Shivkumar, MD, PhD
Director, UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center; Professor, Department of Medicine Radiology, UCLA
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Address 100 UCLA Medical Plaza, suite 6300 Suite # 690 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-6433

Dr. Shivkumar received his medical degree from the University of Madras, India in 1991 and his PhD from UCLA in 2000. He completed his cardiology fellowship training at the University of California, Los Angeles, and upon completion of his training joined the faculty at University of Iowa, where he also served as the Associate Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology.

In 2002, he was recruited back to UCLA to direct the newly created UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. His field of specialization is interventional cardiac electrophysiology and he heads a group at UCLA that is involved in developing innovative techniques for the non-pharmacological management of cardiac arrhythmias.

He is currently Professor of Medicine and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Radiology at UCLA.

Dr. Shivkumar is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in the subspecialties of Cardiovascular Disease and Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology.

He holds memberships in several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology and the Heart Rhythm Society.

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Igor Spigelman, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Oral Biology and Medicine, UCLA
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Address UCLA School of Dentistry 10833 Le Conte Ave. Box 951668 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-3190

Dr. Igor Spigelman joined the faculty at the UCLA School of Dentistry in 1991. He contributes to teaching in the dental school curriculum and in graduate school courses including the interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program. His research on the mechanisms of chronic pain and alcohol addiction resulted in numerous publications and two patents.

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Catia Sternini, MD
Professor, Department of Medicine Digestive Diseases/Gastroenterology, Neurobiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA
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Address 650 Charles E, Young Dr. South Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: 310-825-6526Lab Phone: 310-825-5483

The “Brain in the Gut” and Taste Receptors

My research program is concerned with the neuronal circuits that control gastrointestinal motility and the mechanisms that govern receptor-mediated responses in the enteric nervous system, the “brain in the gut”, and with chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, the main lines of my research include: (1) trafficking and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors induced by physiological and pathophysiological events with an emphasis on µ opioid receptor, the target of opioid analgesics used for pain control, which mediates opioid bowel syndrome and tolerance, and (2) role of taste signaling molecules in the regulation of gastrointestinal functions and feeding behavior. My group was the first to demonstrate that opioids differing in their ability to induce tolerance also differ in their efficiency to induce µOR trafficking, a process that regulates receptor signaling and function. The findings of ligand-selective and stimulation-dependent µOR internalization in enteric neurons are of importance for understanding the mechanisms underlying intracellular adaptations induced by prolonged activation of µORs, which hamper the use of opioids as analgesics. Furthermore, we have shown that µOR activation exerts a protective effect on acute intestinal inflammation through cytokine and NF-KB modulation. Another focus of my research is on the role of taste signaling molecules as chemosensory receptors in the gut mucosa, which are likely to modulate gut function and food intake through the release of signaling molecules by enteroendocrine cells, with emphasis on bitter taste receptors, a putative side of defense from potentially toxic substances, drugs and pathogens. The recent discovery that taste receptors for sweet and bitter are expressed throughout the body and not only in the tongue has given rise to the concept of a broader role for these receptors beyond “taste”. My lab has shown that taste signaling molecules are expressed by distinct populations of mucosal cells, including enteroendocrine cells, which synthesize peptides affecting motility, secretion, satiety and hunger, and that bitter taste receptors are regulated by feeding and different diets, suggesting they participate in the functional detection of intraluminal content and they serve as regulators of diet-induced responses by detecting changes in the microbiota.

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Yvette Tache, PhD
Co-Director, UCLA Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Director, Cure: Animal Models Core; Professor, Digestive Diseases/Gastroenterology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Phone: (310) 312-9275Fax: (310) 268-4963

Dr. Yvette Taché is a recognized leading expert in brain-gut interactions and the role of peptides in the underlying mechanisms of stress-related gut dysfunction. She and her research team reported some of the pioneer work on the central actions of peptides to influence digestive function and feeding behavior. Her laboratory provided the preclinical ground work showing potential benefit of blocking corticotropin releasing signaling pathways in experimental models of irritable bowel syndrome.

Dr. Taché joined the Digestive Disease Division in 1982 and as been appointed Professor-in Residence in 1987. Professor Taché developed this field of research through continued competitive grants obtained from the National Institute of Health (NIH) since 1982 as well as Veteran Administration (VA) Merit Award since 2000. She is Director of the Animal core within the Digestive Disease Center and a co-Director of the UCLA Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress. She published 370 peer-reviewed articles articles and 160 reviews and edited several books. Professor Taché has been the recipients of NIH MERIT Award, the Distinguished Research Award in Gastrointestinal Physiology from the American Physiological Society, the Janssen Award for Basic Research in Gastrointestinal Motility, the Senior Investigator–Basic Science Award from the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, the Research Scientist Award from the Functional Brain-Gut Research Group, the Outstanding American Gastroenterology Association Women in Sciences , the Research Mentor Award, AGA Institute Council Neurogastroenterology & Motility Section and senior VA Research Career Scientist Award. She served on NIH and VA Administration grant application review panels and editorial boards of many peptides, integrative physiology and stress-related journal and is an associated editor of PLoS One.

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Kirsten Tillisch, MD
Director, Mind Body Research Program, Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 267-0537Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279

Dr. Kirsten Tillisch completed her undergraduate work at the Otis Institute of Parsons School of Design, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honors. She obtained her medical degree from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and was elected to the medical honor society Alpha Omega Alpha. She continued on at UCLA to complete her training in internal medicine and gastroenterology, graduating in 2003. Her clinical interests are functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and cyclic vomiting syndrome. Her research interests include brain-gut interactions , the effects of nonpharmacological therapies on functional gastrointestinal disorders, and pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Her recent research projects include defining resting state brain dysfunction in irritable bowel syndrome patients, evaluating the role of gut microbiota modulation on emotional processing in the brain, and assessment of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists effects on the gut and brain in irritable bowel syndrome. She is a member of the Neuroimaging Program of the Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress.

Selected References:

Mayer EA, Tillisch K, Gupta A. Gut/brain axis and the microbiota. J Clin Invest. 2015 Mar 2;125(3):926-38. doi: 10.1172/JCI76304. Epub 2015 Feb 17. Review. PubMed PMID: 25689247; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4362231.

Mayer EA, Knight R, Mazmanian SK, Cryan JF, Tillisch K. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience. J Neurosci. 2014 Nov 12;34(46):15490-6. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3299-14.2014. Review. PubMed PMID: 25392516; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4228144.

Mayer EA, Padua D, Tillisch K. Altered brain-gut axis in autism: comorbidity or causative mechanisms? Bioessays. 2014 Oct;36(10):933-9. doi: 10.1002/bies.201400075. Epub 2014 Aug 22. Review. PubMed PMID: 25145752.

Tillisch K, Labus JS. Neuroimaging the microbiome-gut-brain axis. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2014;817:405-16. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0897-4_18. Review. PubMed PMID: 24997044.

Tillisch K. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans. Gut Microbes. 2014 May-Jun;5(3):404-10. doi: 10.4161/gmic.29232. Epub 2014 May 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 24838095; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4153780.

Tillisch K, Labus J, Kilpatrick L, Jiang Z, Stains J, Ebrat B, Guyonnet D, Legrain-Raspaud S, Trotin B, Naliboff B, Mayer EA. Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity. Gastroenterology. 2013 Jun;144(7):1394-401, 1401.e1-4. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043. Epub 2013 Mar 6. PubMed PMID: 23474283; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3839572.

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Jennie Tsao, PhD
Director of Pediatric Pain Research; Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics, UCLA
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Address Pediatric Pain Research Program 10940 Wilshire Blvd Suite 1450 Los Angeles CA 90024 Phone: (310) 824-7667

Dr. Jennie C. I. Tsao completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at UCLA and is currently a Professor of Pediatrics in the UCLA Children’s Pain & Comfort Care Program. Dr. Tsao’s research interests center on the relationships among pain, anxiety, and health outcomes, including pain-related functioning and utilization of conventional and complementary/alternative healthcare. Dr. Tsao’s research is particularly focused on the laboratory pain models in relation to acute and chronic/recurrent pain, as well as on parent-child pain relationships.

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Hong Yang, MD, PhD
Researcher Physiologist, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Phone: 310-478-3711

Hong Yang is a physiologist who has served on the UCLA School of Medicine since she joined the Department of Medicine in 1987. She became a full Researcher in 2002 and is a member of Brain Research Institute, Center for Ulcer Research and Education: Digestive Diseases Research Center and Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women’™s Health. Dr. Yang earned her M.D and Ph.D. in Physiology at Beijing Medical University in China. She was a postdoctoral fellow, an Assistant Researcher and Associate Researcher at the Department of Medicine, UCLA where she worked on Brain-Gut Interactions. Dr. Yang’™s research focuses on the medullary mechanism of autonomic disorders in metabolic diseases. She is the principal investigator of NIH and Department of Veterans Affairs funded grants for investigating the medullary mechanism of hypothyroidism-induced autonomic disorders. She is also a reviewer for multiple scientific journals including Am J Physiol (E,G,R), Metabolism and J Physiol, as well as an ad hoc grant reviewer for American Diabetes Association, the Department of Veterans Affairs and NIH/HIDDK.

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Lonnie Zeltzer, MD
Professor, Anesthesiology, Pediatrics Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA; Associate Director, JCCC Patients and Survivors Program
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Phone: (310) 825-0731Fax: (310) 794-2104

Dr. Zeltzer is a Professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Director of the Pediatric Pain Program at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital, and Past-Medical Director of Trinity KidsCare pediatric hospice. She is also Associate Director of the Patients and Survivors Program in the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, on the steering committee of the UCLA Centers for Integrative Medicine, the UCLA Psychoneuroimmunology Program, and the Center for Neurovisceral Sciences. Her pain program integrates complementary and traditional therapies for treatment of chronic and cancer pain in children, and she studies the development of chronic pain, mind-body-pain connections, and the impact of complementary therapies on chronic pain. She has over 200 publications, including her recently published book, “Conquering your Child’s Chronic Pain: a Pediatrician’s Guide for Reclaiming a Normal Childhood,”(HarperCollins, 2005). She has been an invited expert on the Peter Jennings Show, Today Show, Discovery Channel, and National Public Television, as well as others, including a recent filming for the update of the Bill Moyers’ mind-body medicine series (“Good Medicine”) on PBS. She and her husband co-hosted the most widely tuned in medical program for WebMD on the internet. She was also featured in a leading Newsweek story on pediatric pain in May 2004, a September 2004 New York Times article on belly pain in children, a February 2005 Time Magazine story on chronic pain, as well as stories about pediatric pain in the Washington Post and in the Boston Globe in March 2005. She and her program were on ABC’s Good Morning America and the Evening News with Peter Jennings on May 10. She was featured in a story on pediatric pain in USA Today on May 9 and on NPR’s California Report on May 25, 2005.

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