Members of the Center for Neurobiology of Stress fall into one or more of the following categories: (1) investigators at UCLA, VAGLAHS, Ohio State University, University of Pittsburgh, or other campus who are principal or co-principal investigators with peer-reviewed, competitive funding for research in neurovisceral sciences, gastrointestinal disorders, urological disorders, and stress neurobiology, and stress-immune system interactions, particularly related to sex-based differences and whose research directly impacts the goals of the Center; (2) division chiefs in gastroenterology, urology, obstetrics and gynecology, and psychiatry; (3) directors or co-directors of programs or cores, or individuals who have relevant roles within the Center and (4) clinicians who have made significant contributions to the main subject matters of the Center.

If you are interested in becoming a member, please contact Million Mulugeta, DVM, PhD at mmuluget@ucla.edu.

Members are listed in alphabetical order.


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A

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Jeffrey Alger, PhD
Professor, Departments of Neurology and Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA 660 Charles E. Young Drive South Los Angeles CA 90085 Phone: (310) 206-3344

Dr. Jeffry R. Alger received a PhD in biophysical chemistry under the direction of Professor James H. Prestegard at Yale University in 1979. Dr. Alger’s PhD dissertation research focused on nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization transfer. He did postdoctoral training on multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of cells and living animals in the Yale Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry between 1979 and 1984 under the direction of Dr. Robert G. Shulman. During his appointment as assistant professor in the Yale Department of Radiology (1984-1986), he participated in the design and construction of the first Magnetic Resonance Center at the Yale University School of Medicine. From 1986 until 1994, Dr. Alger was a staff scientist, and later a section chief, at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Maryland. During this period he performed some of the first proton MRS studies of human brain cancer and was an early pioneer in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of stroke. In 1994, Dr. Alger moved to Los Angeles and became a faculty member at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the Department of Radiology and in the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center. He was promoted to the rank of Professor in July 2000. His primary faculty appointment moved to the UCLA Department of Neurology in 2005. His current research lies in neuroscience imaging applications of MRI with focus on MRS, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion imaging. A general research goal is to develop magnetic resonance biomarkers that can assess neurological diseases and disorders. He collaborates with teams doing clinical trials and clinical research studies involving stroke, traumatic brain injury, cerebral neoplasia, multiple sclerosis and HIV dementia. In 2007 his laboratory acquired a 7 T 30 cm MRI system which is being used to pursue analogous research in animal models. Dr. Alger has co-authored more than 140 peer-reviewed publications. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and by private foundations. Dr. Alger is affiliated with UCLA’s Interdepartmental Program in Biomedical Physics where he teaches graduate level courses in human anatomy and medical imaging. He also supervises the dissertation research of medical physics PhD students.

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John Allman, PhD
Frank P. Hixon Professor of Neurobiology, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology
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Peter A. Anton, MD
Director, Mucosal Immunology Core (CFAR) UCLA Center for HIV Prevention Research (CPR); Professor, Department of Medicine Digestive Diseases/Gastroenterology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 2734 MRL 701922 Los Angeles CA 90024 Phone: (310) 825-1597Fax: (310) 267-2571

Dr. Anton is the Director of the UCLA Center for HIV and Digestive Diseases and co-Director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Center at UCLA. Dr. Anton’s research is in the field of mucosal immunology and was initially directed toward identifying mechanisms underlying the neuroimmunomodulatory responses in IBD. His expertise in T cell acquisition from endoscopic biopsies and interest in the mucosal immune system has been applied to the area of HIV pathogenesis. This has entailed optimizing assays for isolating mucosal T cells for phenotypic analysis by flow and quantitating HIV viral burden in the tissue (both HIV RNA and DNA). His current research uses these assays and other developing indices of mucosal immune response to assess (i) the degree of mucosal inflammation and altered co-receptor expression associated with HIV infection (and associated therapeutic interventions) and (ii) the potential use of the mucosa as a route of HIV immunization. Dr. Anton is active in the NIH-sponsored AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), Mucosal Immunology Focus Group, and in efforts to clarify the role of compartments in HIV pathogenesis.

Selected References:

Cole SW, Kemeny ME, Weitzman OB, Schoen M, Anton PA. Socially inhibited individuals show heightened DTH response during intense social engagement. Brain, Behavior and Immunity. 1999; 13:187-200.

Rawsthorne P, Shanahan F, Cronin NC, Anton PA, Löfberg R, Bohman L, Bernstein CN. An international survey of the use and attitudes regarding alternative medicine by patients with inflammatory bowel disease. American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1999; 94:1298-1303.

Goode T, O’Connell J, Anton P, Wong H, Reeve J, O’Sullivan GC, Collins JK, Shanahan F. Neurokinin-1 receptor expression in inflammatory bowel disease: molecular quantitation and localisation. Gut (England). 2000; 47(3):387-96.

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Arthur Arnold, PhD
Director, Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute; Distinguished Professor, Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology, UCLA
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Address Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology Terasaki Life Sciences Building Rooom 1129 610 Charles Young Drive South Los Angeles CA 90095-7239 Phone: (310) 825-2169Lab Phone: (310) 825-9340Website: Art Arnold Laboratory

We study the biological origins of sex differences, especially in the brain. All sex differences stem from the differential effects of genes on the sex chromosomes. We study the direct efffects of sex chromosome genes on the brain and other cells, differences caused by X- and Y-linked genes. We also study the indirect effects of these genes, for example the powerful sex-specific effects of gonadal hormones. Our studies focus on two model systems in songbirds and mice. We exploit mouse models in which gonadal sex (testes vs. ovaries) is independent of sex chromosome complement(XX vs. XY). In songbirds, we study the neural circuit for song, which is structurally much different in males and females. We also study the basic properites of sex chromosomes in birds, and mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation.

Selected References:

Gatewood JD, Wills A, Shetty S, Xu J, Arnold AP, Burgoyne PS, Rissman EF. 2006. Sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex influence aggressive and parental behaviors in mice Journal of Neuroscience 26: 2335-2342 .

Itoh Y, Kampf K, Arnold AP. 2006. Assignment of human X chromosome-syntenic genes to a zebra finch microchromosome by in situ hybridization of BAC clones Cytogenetic and Genome Research 112: 343-344 .

Xu J, Taya, S, Kaibuchi K, Arnold AP.. 2005. Spatially and temporally specific expression in mouse hippocampus of Usp9x, a ubiquitin-specific protease involved in synaptic development. Journal of Neuroscience Research 80: 47-55 .

Itoh Y, Arnold AP. 2005. Chromosomal polymorphism and comparative painting analysis in the zebra finch Chromosome Research 13: 47-56 .

Palaszynski KM, Smith DL, Burgoyne PS, Arnold AP, Voskuhl RR. 2005. A yin-yang effect between sex chromosomes and sex hormones on the immune response Endocrinology 146: 3280-3285 .

Chen X, Agate RJ, Itoh Y, Arnold AP. 2005. Sexually dimorphic expression of trkB, a Z-linked gene, in early posthatch zebra finch brain Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 102: 7730-7735 .

Xu J, Taya S, Kaibuchi K, Arnold AP. 2005. Sexually dimorphic expression of Usp9x is related to sex chromosome complement in adult mouse brain European Journal of Neuroscience 21: 3017-3022 .

Kim Y-H, Arnold AP.. 2005. Distribution and onset of aldehyde dehydrogenase (zRalDH) expression in zebra finch brain: lack of sex difference in HVC and RA at early posthatch ages Journal of Neurobiology 65: 260-268 .

Xu J, Watkins R, Arnold AP.. 2005. Sexually dimorphic expression of the X-linked gene Eif2s3x mRNA but not protein in mouse brain Gene Expression Patterns 6: 146-155 .

Luo M., Yu Y, Kim H, Kudrna D, Itoh Y, Agate RJ, Melamed E, Goicoechea JL, Talag J, Mueller C, Wang W, Currie J, Sisneros NB, Wing RA, Arnold AP. 2005. Utilization of a zebra finch BAC library to determine the structure of an avian androgen receptor genomic region Genomics 87: 181-190 .

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B

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Lori Birder, PhD
Professor, Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, University of Pittsburgh
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Address A1207 Scaife Hall Pittsburgh PA 15261 Phone: (412) 383-7368Fax: (412) 648-7197

My laboratory is interested in understanding the complexities of urinary bladder epithelial (urothelial) cell function and urothelial cell-neuronal interactions. Our investigations have revealed that the urothelium, a stratified epithelial layer that lines the bladder lumen, might have the capacity to send signals to neighboring cells via the release of chemical mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and ATP.

Our recent identification of a number of functional receptors/ion channels in bladder urothelial cells and the possible involvement of these receptors/ion channels in the release of mediators suggest that these cells exhibit specialized sensory and signaling properties. For example, we recently found that vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) is expressed not only by afferent nerves that form close contacts with urothelial cells, but also by the urothelial cells themselves.

This arrangement would represent a departure from the conventional view of the urothelium as a simple barrier and provide further support for our speculation that the urothelium has “neuron-like” properties and that it may play a role in sensory mechanisms in the urinary bladder. Through an array of experimental approaches that include molecular biology (mouse knockouts; micro array analysis), measurement of transmitters (ATP, NO), Ca2+/confocal imaging techniques and in vivo monitoring of afferent and reflex bladder activity, our goals are to further characterize the properties of urothelial cells.

Elucidation of mechanisms impacting on urothelial function in addition to how pathology may impact on mechanisms of urothelial communication may provide important insight into targets for new therapies for the clinical management of lower urinary tract disorders.

Selected References

Hanna-Mitchell AT, JM Beckel, S Barbadora, AJ Kanai, WC de Groat and LA Birder. Non-neuronal acetylcholine and urinary bladder urothelium. Life Sciences in press.
Chopra B, SE Barrick, S Meyers, JM Beckel, ML Zeidel, AP Ford, WC de Groat and LA Birder. Expression and function of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors in normal and inflamed rat urinary bladder urothelium Journal of Physiology 562:859-871, 2005.

Birder LA, A Wolf-Johnston, CA Buffington, JR Roppolo, WC de Groat and AJ Kanai. Altered inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production in the bladder of cats with feline interstitial cystitis. Journal of Urology 173:625-629, 2005.

Birder LA, HZ Ruan, B Chopra, Z Xiang, S Barrick, CA Buffington, JR Roppolo, AP Ford, WC de Groat and G Burnstock. Alterations in P2X and P2Y purinergic receptor expression in urinary bladder from normal cats and cats with interstitial cystitis. Am J Physiology 287:F1084-1091, 2004.

Birder LA, Y Nakamura, S Kiss, M Nealen, S Barrick, AJ Kanai, E Wang, G Ruiz, WC de Groat, G Apodaca, W Watkins and MJ Caterina. Altered bladder function in mice lacking the vanilloid receptor TRPV1. Nature Neuroscience 5(9):856-890, 2002.

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Sylvie Bradesi, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor, The Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Home 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 267-0525Fax: (310) 825-1919

Sylvie Bradesi received her Ph.D. in Digestive Physiology from the University Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France, in 2001. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women’s Health at UCLA. Her research focuses on animal models for visceral pain with a specific interest in stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia. She is the author of several articles and abstracts presented at different international meetings. Her research was supported by the French Foundation for Medical Research award in 2001.

Selected References:

Bradesi S, Golovatscka V, Ennes HS, McRoberts JA, Karagiannides I, Bakirtzi K, Pothoulakis C, Mayer EA. Role of astrocytes and altered regulation of spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission in stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2011 Sep;301(3):G580-9. Epub 2011 Jun 30. Erratum in: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2011 Nov;301(5):G942. PubMed PMID: 21719739; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3174538.

Bradesi S, Svensson CI, Steinauer J, Pothoulakis C, Yaksh TL, Mayer EA. Role of spinal microglia in visceral hyperalgesia and NK1R up-regulation in a rat model of chronic stress. Gastroenterology. 2009 Apr;136(4):1339-48, e1-2. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2812027.

Bradesi S, Mayer EA. Experimental models of stress and pain: do they help to develop new therapies? Dig Dis. 2009;27 Suppl 1:55-67. Epub 2010 Mar 4. Review.

Bradesi S, Martinez V, Lao L, Larsson H, Mayer EA. Involvement of vasopressin 3 receptors in chronic psychological stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2009 Feb;296(2):G302-9.

Bradesi S, Herman J, Mayer EA. Visceral analgesics: drugs with a great potential in functional disorders? Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2008 Dec;8(6):697-703. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2651816.

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C

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Lin Chang, MD
Director, Functional GI Disroders Program, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Lin Chang, MD, is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Neurobiology of Stress at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She is also Director of the Digestive Health and Nutrition Clinic at UCLA. Dr. Chang’s clinical expertise is in functional gastrointestinal disorders which include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic constipation, and functional dyspepsia. Dr. Chang’s research is focused on the pathophysiology of IBS related to stress, sex differences, and neuroendocrine alterations and the treatment of IBS. She is a funded NIH-investigator studying the central and peripheral mechanisms underlying IBS.

She is the recipient of the Janssen Award in Gastroenterology for Basic or Clinical Research and the AGA Distinguished Clinician Award, Dr. Chang has authored more than 70 original research articles, 48 review articles, and 19 book chapters on her specialty interests and is a frequent speaker at national and international meetings. She is a fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association and American College of Gastroenterology, and a member of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Chang serves as an Associate Editor of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. She is a member of the Rome Foundation Board of Directors, the Rome IV Editorial Board and the Rome IV Functional Bowel Disorders Committee. She is President of the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ANMS). She served on the FDA GI Advisory Committee from 2005-2010 which she also chaired.

Selected References

Chang L, Adeyemo M, Karagiannides I, Videlock EJ, Bowe C, Shih W, Presson AA, Yuan PQ, Gong H, Singh S, Cortina G, Licudine A, Tache Y, Pothoulakis C, Mayer EA. Serum and colonic immune markers in irritable bowel syndrome. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012; 107(2):262-72.

Naliboff BD, Kim S, Bolus R, Bernstein CN, Mayer EA, Chang L. Gastrointestinal and Psychological Mediators of Health Related Quality of Life in IBS and IBD: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis. American Journal of Gastroenterology 2012;107:451–459..

Bradford K, Shih W, Videlock E, Presson AP, Naliboff BD, Mayer EA, Chang L. Association of early adverse life events and irritable bowel syndrome. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2012;10(4):385-390.

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Michelle G. Craske, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychology, UCLA
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Phone: (310) 825-8403Fax: (310) 206-5895

Dr. Craske is Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, and Director of the Anxiety Disorders Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles. She has published widely on the topics of fear and anxiety disorders, their etiology, assessment and treatment. She has been the recipient of continuous NIMH funding since 1993 for research projects pertaining to risk factors for phobias, anxiety disorders and depression; attentional biases and psychophysiological fear responding; the translation of basic science of fear extinction to human phobias and mechanisms of exposure therapy; and the development and implementation of treatments for anxiety and related disorders. Dr. Craske was Associate Editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology and is currently Associate Editor for Behaviour Research and Therapy is a Scientific Board Member for the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, and a member of the Anxiety Disorders Work Group for DSM-V.

Selected References:

Craske MG, Wolitzky-Taylor KB, Mineka S, Zinbarg R, Waters AM, Vrshek-Schallhorn S, Epstein A, Naliboff B, Ornitz E. Elevated responding to safe conditions as a specific risk factor for anxiety versus depressive disorders: Evidence from a longitudinal investigation. J Abnorm Psychol. 2011.

Craske MG, Wolitzky-Taylor KB, Labus J, Wu S, Frese M, Mayer EA, Naliboff BD. A cognitive-behavioral treatment for irritable bowel syndrome using interoceptive exposure to visceral sensations. Behav Res Ther. 2011 Jun;49(6-7):413-21. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3100429.

Craske MG, Stein MB, Sullivan G, Sherbourne C, Bystritsky A, Rose RD, Lang AJ, Welch S, Campbell-Sills L, Golinelli D, Roy-Byrne P. Disorder-specific impact of coordinated anxiety learning and management treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;68(4):378-88. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3074172.

Craske MG, Kircanski K, Epstein A, Wittchen HU, Pine DS, Lewis-Fernández R, Hinton D; DSM V Anxiety; OC Spectrum; Posttraumatic and Dissociative Disorder Work Group. Panic disorder: a review of DSM-IV panic disorder and proposals for DSM-V. Depress Anxiety. 2010 Feb;27(2):93-112. Review.

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E

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Christopher Evans, PhD
Director, Brain Research Institute, Hatos Center for Neuropharmacology; Professor, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA
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Address MacDonald Research Laboratories, Room 2760 675 Charles Young Drive Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-7884Lab Phone: (310) 206-7883Fax: (310) 825-7067

Dr. Chris Evans is currently Director of the UCLA Brain Research Institute and the Stefan Hatos Professor directing the Shirley and Stefan Hatos Center for Neurophamacology in the UCLA Semel Institute. Dr. Evans is also director of a NIH-funded center – The Center for Opioid Receptors and Drugs of Abuse or CSORDA. CSORDA, with continuous NIH funding for over 25 years.

Selected References:

Gioiosa, L. Chen, X. Watkins, R. Klanfer, N. Bryant, C. D. Evans, C. J. Arnold, A. P. Sex chromosome complement affects nociception in tests of acute and chronic exposure to morphine in mice. Horm Behav. 2008; 53(1): 124-30.

Walwyn, W. Evans, C. J. Hales, T. G. Beta-arrestin2 and c-Src regulate the constitutive activity and recycling of mu opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons. J Neurosci. 2007; 27(19): 5092-104.

Kho, S. T. Lopez, I. A. Evans, C. Ishiyama, A. Ishiyama, G. Immunolocalization of orphanin FQ in rat cochlea. Brain Res. 2006; 1113(1): 146-52.

Bryant, C. D. Roberts, K. W. Byun, J. S. Fanselow, M. S. Evans, C. J. Morphine analgesic tolerance in 129P3/J and 129S6/SvEv mice. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2006; 85(4): 769-79.

Walwyn, W. M. Wei, W. Xie, C. W. Chiu, K. Kieffer, B. L. Evans, C. J. Maidment, N. T. Mu opioid receptor-effector coupling and trafficking in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Neuroscience. 2006; 142(2): 493-503.

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Michael Fanselow, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychology, UCLA; Area Chair, Learning and Behavior
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Phone: (310) 206-0247Fax: (310) 206-5895Website: Fanselow Lab

Dr. Fanselow has held academic appointments at Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute and Dartmouth College before coming to UCLA in 1987. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington, where he received the Edwin B Newman Award for Excellence in Research. He has also received the Early Career Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association and the Troland Award from the National Academy of Science for his analysis of basic mechanisms of motivational systems. He is interested in how the neural systems that control fear, pain and recuperation interact with each other to produce both adaptive and maladaptive behavior. He was elected President of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Behavioral Neuroscience and Comparative Psychology and is currently President of the Pavlovian Society.

Selected References:

Fanselow MS, LeDoux JE. Why we think plasticity underlying Pavlovian fear conditioning occurs in the basolateral amygdala. Neuron. 1999; 23:229-232.

Fendt M, Fanselow MS. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical basis of conditioned fear. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 1999; 23:743-760.

Li HH, Yu W-H, Rozengurt N, Zhao H-Z, Lyons KM, Anagnostaras S, Fanselow MS, Suzuki K, Vanier MT, Neufeld EF. Mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B produced by targeted disruption of the gene encoding alpha -N-acetylglucosaminidase. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA. 1999; 96:14505-14510.

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Daniel Holschneider, MD
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Department of Cell and Neurobiology, University of Southern California
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Phone: (323) 442-1536Fax: (323) 442-1586

The Laboratory of Vertebrate Functional Brain Mapping has over a decade of experience in imaging of the rodent brain, with expertise in behaviors in rodent models of pain, anxiety, brain injury, and anxiety, as well as in physiologic monitoring (ECG, EMG, EEG, cardiovascular function). The lab uses a variety of techniques in the analyses of the three-dimensional autoradiographic data sets of the rat and mouse brains, including region-of-interest analysis, statistical parametric mapping, as well as functional connectivity. A primary interest has been the development of new methods for functional brain imaging of rodent behaviors as they occur in freely moving animal in normal and pathological states. Ongoing projects examine activation of neural circuits and functional brain reorganization in rat models of visceral pain, traumatic brain injury, ‘Parkinson’s Disease’, and the serotonin transporter knockout mouse.

Selected References:

Wang Z, Ocampo MA, Pang RD, Bota M, Bradesi S, Mayer EA, Holschneider DP “Alterations in Prefrontal-Limbic Functional Activation and Connectivity in Chronic Stress-Induced Visceral Hyperalgesia”, PLoS ONE, 8(3):e59138, 2013, PMID:23527114

Holschneider DP, Guo Y, Wang Z, Roch M, Scremin OU, “Remote brain networks changes after unilateral cortical impact injury and their modulation by acetylcholinesterase inhibition” Journal of Neurotrauma, 30(11):907-919, 2013, PMID:23343118

Wang Z, Myers KG, Guo Y, Ocampo MA, Pang RD, Jakowec MW, Holschneider DP, “Functional reorganization of motor and limbic circuits after forced exercise training in a rat model of bilateral Parkinsonism”, PLoS ONE, 8(11), e80058, 2013, PMID:24278239

Holschneider DP, Wang Z, Pang RD, “Functional connectivity-based parcellation and connectome of cortical midline structures in the mouse: a perfusion autoradiography study”, Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, Jun 11;8:61. doi: 10.3389/fninf.2014.00061, 2014, PMID 24966831

Wang Z, Guo Y, Myers KG, Heintz R, Peng Y-H, Maarek J-MI, Holschneider DP “Exercise alters resting state functional connectivity of motor circuits in Parkinsonian rats,” Neurobiology of Aging, in press

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Elaine Hsiao, PhD
Assistant Professor, De Logi Chair in Biological Sciences, Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Dr. Elaine Y. Hsiao is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology at UCLA, where she leads a laboratory studying fundamental interactions between the microbiome, brain and behavior, and their applications to neurological disorders. Her studies on the relationships between the microbiota, immune system and nervous system led her to discover that the microbiota can regulate behavioral, metabolic and gastrointestinal abnormalities relevant to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Her work in this area, and on neuroimmune interactions in autism, has led to several honors, including the National Institutes of Health Director’s Early Independence Award, distinction as Forbes’ 30 Under 30 in Science and Healthcare, National Geographic’s Emerging Explorer Award and fellowships from the National Institute of Mental Health and Autism Speaks. Inspired by this interplay between the microbiota and nervous system, the Hsiao laboratory is mining the human microbiota for microbial modulators of host neuroactive molecules, investigating the impact of microbiota-immune system interactions on neurodevelopment and examining the microbiome as an interface between gene-environment interactions in neurological diseases.

Selected References

Yano JM, Yu K, Donaldson G, Shastri G, Ma L, Ann P, Nagler C, Ismagilov RF, Mazmanian SK, Hsiao EY (2015) Indigenous bacteria from the gut microbiota regulate host serotonin biosynthesis. Cell, 161:264-76.

Hsiao EY, McBride SW, Hsien S, Sharon G, Hyde ER, McCue T, Codelli JA, Chow J, Reisman SE, Petrosino JF, Patterson PH*, Mazmanian SK* (2013) The microbiota modulates behavioral and physiological abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Cell, 155:1451-1463.

Hsiao EY, McBride SW, Chow J, Mazmanian SK, Patterson PH (2012) Modeling an autism risk factor in mice leads to permanent immune dysregulation. PNAS 109:12776-81

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Jonathan Jacobs, MD, PhD
Clinical Instructor of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Dr. Jonathan Jacobs is a Clinical Instructor in the Division of Digestive Diseases within the UCLA Department of Medicine. His research background is in immunology and the intestinal microbiome. He originally trained under Diane Mathis and Christophe Benoist at Harvard, where he published three first author papers on the immunopathological mechanisms of arthritis in an autoantibody-mediated model. He later joined Jonathan Braun’s lab at UCLA to investigate the interactions of the mucosal immune system and the intestinal microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). He utilized human cohorts and transgenic mice to demonstrate that the IBD-associated genes RORC and TL1A, both involved in mucosal immunity, garden the intestinal microbiome. This raises the possibility that genetic risk factors promote IBD through their effects on the microbiome. An ongoing human cohort study with Dr. Braun aims to define the microbial and metabolomics features of IBD in the colonic mucosa and to characterize their relationship to IBD-associated genetic polymorphisms. In a separate translational study, he found that healthy relatives of pediatric IBD patients could be classified by their intestinal microbial and metabolomics profiles into “enterotypes” and “metabotypes” that may predict their future risk for IBD. He has authored a review article, a commentary, and two textbook chapters on intestinal host-microbiome interactions. His current research employs in vivo models and multi’omics analysis of IBD cohorts to define the role of IBD-associated genes in shaping the intestinal microbiome and to identify microbial products that promote IBD.

Selected References

Jacobs JP, Braun J. Immune and genetic gardening of the intestinal microbiome. FEBS Letters. 2014 Mar 5; pii: S0014. [PMID: 24613921]

Jacobs J, Braun J. Host genes and their effect on the intestinal microbiome garden. Genome Med. 2014 Dec 17; 6(12):119. [PMID: 25593597]

Jacobs JP, Tong M, McHardy I, Goudarzi M, Ruegger P, McGovern D, Borneman J, Fornace A, Dubinsky M, Braun J. Disease-associated enterotypes and metabotypes in families with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Submitted, 2015.

Complete Publications List

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/browse/collection/48438874/

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Lisa Kilpatrick, PhD
Assistant Researcher, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0547Fax: (310) 825-1919

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Jennifer Labus, PhD
Adjunct Associate Professor, UCLA Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior; Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0738

Dr. Labus’s research focuses on mapping the neural networks underlying stress neurobiology with specific emphasis on models of visceral and functional pain and brain-body interactions. Specifically, she is examining altered central and autonomic nervous system processes in functional pain disorders, stress neurobiology, and the statistical methodology applied to interpret the complex data yielded by psychophysiological assessments such as fMRI, PET, acoustic startle response, and heart-rate variability. Dr. Labus recently received a K08 award from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to delineate the neural networks involved in visceral pain and GI function using network analysis. Her research has shown activation of inhibitory cortico-limbic circuitry is associated with more effective descending pain inhibition. In collaboration with the Center for Neurobiology of Stress (formerly named the Center of Neurovisceral Sciences and Women’s Health), her research investigates sex-specific differences in the effective connectivity of emotional-arousal circuitry. Her work also involves imaging genetics and she is currently examining group differences in the neural networks associated with variants of the function polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and the effects of acute lowering of 5-HT levels on engagement of a central arousal network involved in central pain amplification.

Selected References:

https://scholar.google.com/labusjs

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Juan Carlos Marvizon, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine – Division of Digestive Diseases, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and The Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress
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Address UCLA Department of Medicine Box 951792 VA-CURE, Bldg 115, Rm 119 Los Angeles CA 90095-1792 Phone: (310) 478-3711 x41847Fax: (310) 268-4963

Dr. Juan Carlos Marvizón is Assistant Professor at the Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.Dr. Marvizón was born in 1957 in Rome, Italy. He majored in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). He received his Ph.D. in 1985 for his work on the glycine receptor at the Severo Ochoa Center of Molecular Biology in Madrid. During 1985, he worked as a research scientist at Pharmuka Laboratoires, a pharmaceutical company in Paris, France, investigating peripheral benzodiazepine receptors. He was then awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to work at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he studied the biochemistry of glycine and GABA receptors in relation to stress, and later became interested in NMDA receptors. From 1989 to 1991, he was faculty at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain). Prior to coming to UCLA, he was Research Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles, where he worked with Dr. Michel Baudry on the role of NMDA receptors in learning and memory. Dr. Marvizón came to UCLA in 1994. His current research focuses on the role of NMDA, substance P and opioid receptors in pain. He is the principal investigators of a grant from the NIH to study the release of substance P and opioids in the spinal cord.

Selected References:

Marvizon JCG, Grady EF, Stefani E, Bunnett NW, Mayer EA. Substance P release in the dorsal horn assessed by receptor internalization: NMDA receptors counteract a tonic inhibition by GABAB receptors. Eur. J. Neurosci. 11:417-426, 1999.

Marvizon JCG, Wang X, Matsuka Y, Neubert JK and Spigelman I. Relationship between capsaicin-evoked substance P release and NK1 receptor internalization in the rat dorsal horn. Neuroscience 118: 535-545, 2003.
Lao LJ., Song B and Marvizon JCG. Neurokinin release produced by capsaicin acting on the central terminals and axons of primary afferents: relationship with NMDA and GABAB receptors. Neuroscience 121: 667-680, 2003.

Song B and Marvizon JCG. Peptidases prevent m-opioid receptor internalization in dorsal horn neurons by endogenously released opioids. J. Neurosci. 23: 1847-1858, 2003.

Song B and Marvizón JCG. Dorsal horn neurons firing at high frequency, but not primary afferents, release opioid peptides that produce m-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord. J. Neurosci. 23: 9171-9184, 2003.

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Emeran A. Mayer, MD, PhD
Director, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 206-0192Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Emeran Mayer is a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Executive Director of the Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, and Co-director of the CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center at UCLA. He is a world renowned gastroenterologist and neuroscientist with 30 years of experience in the study of clinical and neurobiological aspects of how the digestive system and the nervous system interact in health and disease, and his work has been continuously supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He is currently principal investigator on 4 NIH grants including a center grant from ORWH/NIDDK on sex differences in brain gut interactions, a consortium grant by NIDDK on pelvic pain syndromes, a RO1 grant on the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on brain signatures in IBS and a ROI grant on brain gut microbiome interactions in inflammatory and functional GI disorders (both from NIDDK). He has published over 320 peer reviewed articles (average H index 90), including 100 chapters and reviews, co-edited four books, and organized several interdisciplinary symposia in the area of visceral pain and mind body interactions. His current research focus is on the role of the gut microbiota in brain gut interactions in emotion regulation, chronic visceral pain and in obesity.

Selected References:

Complete reference list: https://scholar.google.com/mayerea

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Photo of Bruce Naliboff, PhD
Bruce Naliboff, PhD
Director, Pain Research Program, UCLA Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 825-0494Fax: (310) 825-1919

Dr. Naliboff received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and interned at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. During his tenure at UCLA and the VA he has served as senior psychologist in the UCLA and VA Pain Management programs and Health Psychology Consultation services. Dr. Naliboff’s research has focused on psychophysiological mechanisms of stress and pain and includes studies of stress effects on the immune system, glucose regulation in diabetes, and cardiovascular variables. In the area of pain, he has utilized experimental pain procedures to study perceptual processes in chronic pain states such as chronic back pain, headache, and visceral pain. He has also studied psychosocial and personality variables in chronic pain and especially their impact on treatment choice and outcome. His work in functional gastrointestinal disorders and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) include perceptual, autonomic, and brain imaging studies of visceral sensation, and the role of psychosocial variables in the presentation, course and treatment of IBS. A major emphasis of his current work is the relationship between central stress mechanisms and both somatic and visceral pain disorders. Another area of interest is in the relationship between anxiety and symptoms in chronic pain disorders. Dr. Naliboff has NIH funding to study gender differences in central responses to visceral sensation as well as the role of visceral specific anxiety in irritable bowel syndrome. He has recently begun a clinical trial comparing several psychological treatments for IBS and has an ongoing clinical trial of opioid medications in chronic pain. He serves as a consulting editor for numerous scientific publications in psychology and medicine and on national and international committees as a grant reviewer and program consultant.

Selected References:

Naliboff BD, Solomon GF, Gilmore S, Benton D, Fahey JL, Pine J. Rapid changes in cellular immunity following a confrontational role-play stressor. Brain Behavior and Immunity. 1995; 9: 207-219.

Naliboff BD, Munakata J, Fullerton S, Gracely R, Kodner A, Harraf F, Mayer EA. Evidence for two distinct perceptual alterations in irritable bowel syndrome. Gut. 1997; 41: 505-512.

Naliboff BD, Derbyshire SWG, Munakata J, Berman S, Mandelkern M, Chang L, Mayer EA. Cerebral activation in irritable bowel syndrome patients and controls subjects during rectosigmoid stimulation. Psychosomatic Medicine. 2001; 63: 365-375.

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Andrea Rapkin, MD
Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, at the David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA; Director, UCLA Pelvic Pain Clinic
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Address UCLA Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Box 951740, 27-139 CHS Los Angeles CA 90095-1740 Phone: (310) 794-7274Fax: (310) 206-3670

Dr. Rapkin received her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1975. She went on to study medicine at the University of New York in Buffalo where she received her M.D. in 1979. Dr. Rapkin completed a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at UCLA School of Medicine in 1983. She is Board Certified by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (of which she is also a fellow). After obtaining her M.D., she joined the faculty at UCLA and is currently a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She also directs the UCLA Pelvic Pain Clinic. Dr. Rapkin has published extensively in the areas of premenstrual syndrome, chronic pelvic pain and women’s reproductive health, with numerous research articles and contributions to textbooks in the area of menstrual-cycle-related mood disorders and pelvic pain. Dr. Rapkin was one of the first Obstetrician-Gynecologists to adapt the multidisciplinary pain management approach to the evaluation and treatment of women with pelvic and vulvar pain. The clinic includes professionals from the areas of psychology, anesthesiology, and physical therapy and provides patient care, resident medical student education, and a fruitful environment for clinical research.

Selected References:

Payne LA, Rapkin AJ, Lung KC, Seidman LC, Zeltzer LK, Tsao JC. Pain Catastrophizing Predicts Menstrual Pain Ratings in Adolescent Girls with Chronic Pain. Pain Med. 2015 Jul 27.

Akopians AL, Rapkin AJ. Vulvodynia: The Role of Inflammation in the Etiology of Localized Provoked Pain of the Vulvar Vestibule (Vestibulodynia). Semin Reprod Med. 2015 Jul;33(4):239-45.

Rapkin AJ, Lewis EI. Treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Womens Health (Lond Engl). 2013 Nov;9(6):537-56.

Gupta A, Rapkin AJ, Gill Z, Kilpatrick L, Fling C, Stains J, Masghati S, Tillisch K, Mayer EA, Labus JS. Disease-related differences in resting-state networks: a comparison between localized provoked vulvodynia, irritable bowel syndrome, and healthy control subjects. Pain. 2015 May;156(5):809-19.

Rapkin AJ, Mikacich JA. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder and severe premenstrual syndrome in adolescents. Paediatr Drugs. 2013 Jun;15(3):191-202.

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Kirsten Tillisch, MD
Director, Mind Body Research Program, Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress; Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
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Address 10833 Le Conte Avenue Center for Health Sciences 42-210 MC:737818 Los Angeles CA 90095 Phone: (310) 267-0537Patient Appointments: (310) 206-6279

Dr. Kirsten Tillisch completed her undergraduate work at the Otis Institute of Parsons School of Design, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honors. She obtained her medical degree from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and was elected to the medical honor society Alpha Omega Alpha. She continued on at UCLA to complete her training in internal medicine and gastroenterology, graduating in 2003. Her clinical interests are functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and cyclic vomiting syndrome. Her research interests include brain-gut interactions , the effects of nonpharmacological therapies on functional gastrointestinal disorders, and pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Her recent research projects include defining resting state brain dysfunction in irritable bowel syndrome patients, evaluating the role of gut microbiota modulation on emotional processing in the brain, and assessment of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists effects on the gut and brain in irritable bowel syndrome. She is a member of the Neuroimaging Program of the Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress.

Selected References:

Mayer EA, Tillisch K, Gupta A. Gut/brain axis and the microbiota. J Clin Invest. 2015 Mar 2;125(3):926-38. doi: 10.1172/JCI76304. Epub 2015 Feb 17. Review. PubMed PMID: 25689247; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4362231.

Mayer EA, Knight R, Mazmanian SK, Cryan JF, Tillisch K. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience. J Neurosci. 2014 Nov 12;34(46):15490-6. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3299-14.2014. Review. PubMed PMID: 25392516; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4228144.

Mayer EA, Padua D, Tillisch K. Altered brain-gut axis in autism: comorbidity or causative mechanisms? Bioessays. 2014 Oct;36(10):933-9. doi: 10.1002/bies.201400075. Epub 2014 Aug 22. Review. PubMed PMID: 25145752.

Tillisch K, Labus JS. Neuroimaging the microbiome-gut-brain axis. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2014;817:405-16. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0897-4_18. Review. PubMed PMID: 24997044.

Tillisch K. The effects of gut microbiota on CNS function in humans. Gut Microbes. 2014 May-Jun;5(3):404-10. doi: 10.4161/gmic.29232. Epub 2014 May 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 24838095; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4153780.

Tillisch K, Labus J, Kilpatrick L, Jiang Z, Stains J, Ebrat B, Guyonnet D, Legrain-Raspaud S, Trotin B, Naliboff B, Mayer EA. Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity. Gastroenterology. 2013 Jun;144(7):1394-401, 1401.e1-4. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.02.043. Epub 2013 Mar 6. PubMed PMID: 23474283; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3839572.

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Photo of Lonnie Zeltzer, MD
Lonnie Zeltzer, MD
Professor, Anesthesiology, Pediatrics Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA; Associate Director, JCCC Patients and Survivors Program
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Phone: (310) 825-0731Fax: (310) 794-2104

Dr. Zeltzer is a Professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Director of the Pediatric Pain Program at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital, and Past-Medical Director of Trinity KidsCare pediatric hospice. She is also Associate Director of the Patients and Survivors Program in the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, on the steering committee of the UCLA Centers for Integrative Medicine, the UCLA Psychoneuroimmunology Program, and the Center for Neurovisceral Sciences. Her pain program integrates complementary and traditional therapies for treatment of chronic and cancer pain in children, and she studies the development of chronic pain, mind-body-pain connections, and the impact of complementary therapies on chronic pain. She has over 200 publications, including her recently published book, “Conquering your Child’s Chronic Pain: a Pediatrician’s Guide for Reclaiming a Normal Childhood,”(HarperCollins, 2005). She has been an invited expert on the Peter Jennings Show, Today Show, Discovery Channel, and National Public Television, as well as others, including a recent filming for the update of the Bill Moyers’ mind-body medicine series (“Good Medicine”) on PBS. She and her husband co-hosted the most widely tuned in medical program for WebMD on the internet. She was also featured in a leading Newsweek story on pediatric pain in May 2004, a September 2004 New York Times article on belly pain in children, a February 2005 Time Magazine story on chronic pain, as well as stories about pediatric pain in the Washington Post and in the Boston Globe in March 2005. She and her program were on ABC’s Good Morning America and the Evening News with Peter Jennings on May 10. She was featured in a story on pediatric pain in USA Today on May 9 and on NPR’s California Report on May 25, 2005.

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